All in the family: Entrepreneurship as a family tradition

Sherry Robinson, Hans Anton Stubberud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Family businesses are an important part of most economies. In the United States, they account for 90% of all businesses (Small Business Association, 2011) and are said to generate approximately 64% of the nation's GDP (Laird Norton Tyee, 2007). Across Europe, 70-80% of businesses are family businesses, including both SMEs and large businesses (Mandl, 2008). Many people who grew up in family businesses or around family members who were self employed eventually choose to start new businesses. In addition, more and more family businesses are now being passed to daughters, rather than to sons (Resources of Entrepreneurs, 2011). This study examines the proportions of men and women in a variety of countries whose motivation for starting a business was based on a family tradition for self-employment. The results show that, in several countries, more women than men state that this tradition was a motive for entrepreneurship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-30
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Entrepreneurship
Volume16
Issue numberAPLISS
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Family business
Entrepreneurship
Business associations
Entrepreneurs
Resources
New business
Small and medium-sized enterprises
Proportion
Small business
Self-employment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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All in the family : Entrepreneurship as a family tradition. / Robinson, Sherry; Stubberud, Hans Anton.

In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship, Vol. 16, No. APLISS, 01.12.2012, p. 19-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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