Alterations in amygdala functional connectivity reflect early temperament

Amy Krain Roy, Brenda E. Benson, Kathryn A. Degnan, Koraly Perez-Edgar, Daniel S. Pine, Nathan A. Fox, Monique Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament identified early in life that is associated with increased risk for anxiety disorders. Amygdala hyperresponsivity, found both in behaviorally inhibited and anxious individuals, suggests that amygdala dysfunction may represent a marker of anxiety risk. However, broader amygdala networks have not been examined in individuals with a history of childhood BI. This study uses resting state fMRI to assess amygdala intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) in 38 healthy young adults (19 with a history of BI, 19 with no history of BI) selected from a longitudinal study. Centromedial, basolateral, and superficial amygdala iFCs were compared between groups and examined in relation to self-report measures of anxiety. Group differences were observed in amygdala iFC with prefrontal cortex, striatum, anterior insula, and cerebellum. Adults characterized with BI in childhood endorsed greater state anxiety prior to entering the scanner, which was associated with several of the group differences. Findings support enduring effects of BI on amygdala circuitry, even in the absence of current psychopathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume103
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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