Ambient fine particulate matter exposure and myocardial ischemia in the Environmental Epidemiology of Arrhythmogenesis in the Women's Health Initiative (EEAWHI) study

Zhu Ming Zhang, Eric A. Whitsel, P. Miguel Quibrera, Richard L. Smith, Duanping Liao, Garnet L. Anderson, Ronald J. Prineas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Ambient particulate matter (PM) air pollution is associated with coronary heart disease, but the pathways underlying the association remain to be elucidated. Methods: We studied the association between PM and ischemia among 57,908 Women's Health Initiative clinical trial participants from 1999-2003. We used the Minnesota Code criteria to identify ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, and estimated T amplitude (microvolt) from resting, standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). We used U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's monitor data to estimate concentrations of PM < 2.5 μm (PM2.5) at geocoded participant addresses over 6 days before the ECGs (lag0 through lag5). We excluded 2,379 women with ECG QRS duration ≥ 120 msec. Results: Overall, 6% of the remaining 55,529 women (52-90 years of age; 83% non-Hispanic white) had ST abnormalities and 16% had T abnormalities. Lead-specific T amplitude was normally distributed (range of means from -14 to 349 μV). PM2.5 (mean ± SD) averaged over lag0-2 was 14 ± 7 μg/m3. In logistic and linear regression models adjusted for demographic, clinical, temporal, and climatic factors, a 10-μg/m3 increase in lag0-2 PM2.5 was associated with a 4% [95% confidence interval (CI), -3%, to 10%] increase in the odds of ST abnormality and a 5% (95% CI, 0% to 9%) increase in the odds of T abnormality. We observed corresponding decreases in T amplitude in all exam sites and leads except lead V1, reaching a minimum of -2 μV (95% CI, -5 to 0 μV) in lead V3. Conclusions: Short-term PM2.5 exposure is associated with ECG evidence of myocardial ischemia among postmenopausal women. The principal manifestations include subclinical but potentially arrhythmogenic ST-T abnormalities and decreases in T amplitude.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-756
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume117
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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