Ambiguous Divorce-Related Communication, Relational Closeness, Relational Satisfaction, and Communication Satisfaction

Tara G. McManus, Jon F. Nussbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using Communication Privacy Management theory, the study argues parents' ambiguity during divorce-related stressor conversations influence parents' and young adult children's relational closeness, satisfaction, and communication satisfaction. Thirty-nine parent-young adult child dyads discussed a divorce-related stressor and reported their thoughts. Hierarchical regression models indicated children's perceptions of parents' ambiguity predicted lower communication satisfaction; however, parents' use of ambiguity was unrelated to relational closeness, satisfaction, or communication satisfaction. Tolerance for ambiguity did not moderate the relationships. Results suggest that offspring may not want detailed information; perceiving parents to use minimal ambiguity may contribute to lower communication satisfaction after discussing divorce-related stressors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-522
Number of pages23
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Fingerprint

divorce
parents
communication
Communication
young adult
dyad
tolerance
privacy
Relational Communication
Relational Satisfaction
Closeness
Divorce
conversation
regression
management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

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Ambiguous Divorce-Related Communication, Relational Closeness, Relational Satisfaction, and Communication Satisfaction. / McManus, Tara G.; Nussbaum, Jon F.

In: Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 75, No. 5, 01.10.2011, p. 500-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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