An analysis of regional and demographic differences in United States internet usage

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Pew Internet and American Life Project collects data on overall Internet usage in the United States. This study reviews data gathered by Pew in December 2002 and tests the overall premise that regional differences exist in Internet usage in the U.S. today. Through Chi-square analysis this report tests whether observed regional and demographic differences in Internet usage are statistically significant. The report first reviews regional and demographic differences separately and finds significant variation across twelve defined regions and ten separate demographic categories. It then reviews demographic differences within regions and tests a series of null hypotheses proposing no significant differences between regions based on the demographic factors. Most of these hypotheses are rejected with noted difference. The report explores other limited hypotheses on the data and concludes with a call for further study to refine the impact of regional and demographic differences in Internet usage in U.S. society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFirst Monday
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

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An analysis of regional and demographic differences in United States internet usage. / Peslak, Alan Robert.

In: First Monday, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.01.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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