An anthropometric survey of US pre-term and full-term neonates

for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act–Pediatric Trials Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Anthropometric data prove valuable for screening and monitoring various medical conditions. In young infants, however, only weight, length and head circumference are represented in publicly accessible databases. Aim: To characterise length and circumferential measures in pre-term and full-term infants up to 90 days post-natal. Subjects and methods: In eight US medical centres, trained raters recorded humeral, ulnar, femoral, tibial and fibular lengths along with mid-upper arm, mid-thigh, chest, abdominal and neck circumference. Data were pooled by post-menstrual age into 1-week intervals and population curves created using the lambda, mu and sigma (LMS) method. Goodness-of-fit was assessed by examining de-trended quantile-quantile plots, Q statistics and fitted centiles overlaid on empirical centiles. Results: In total, 2097 infants were enrolled in this study with a mean ± SD gestational age and post-natal age of 37.1 ± 3.3 weeks and 27.3 ± 25.3 days, respectively. A re-scale option was used to describe all curves. The resultant models reliably characterised anthropometric measures from 33–52 weeks PMA, with less certainty at the extremes (27–55 weeks). Conclusion: The population curves generated under this investigation expand existing reference data on a comprehensive set of anthropometric traits in infants through the first 90 days post-natal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)678-686
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Human Biology
Volume44
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2017

Fingerprint

Newborn Infant
Thigh
Population
Gestational Age
Arm
Neck
Thorax
Head
Databases
Weights and Measures
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Physiology
  • Aging
  • Genetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act–Pediatric Trials Network (2017). An anthropometric survey of US pre-term and full-term neonates. Annals of Human Biology, 44(8), 678-686. https://doi.org/10.1080/03014460.2017.1392603
for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act–Pediatric Trials Network. / An anthropometric survey of US pre-term and full-term neonates. In: Annals of Human Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 44, No. 8. pp. 678-686.
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for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act–Pediatric Trials Network 2017, 'An anthropometric survey of US pre-term and full-term neonates', Annals of Human Biology, vol. 44, no. 8, pp. 678-686. https://doi.org/10.1080/03014460.2017.1392603

An anthropometric survey of US pre-term and full-term neonates. / for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act–Pediatric Trials Network.

In: Annals of Human Biology, Vol. 44, No. 8, 17.11.2017, p. 678-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.

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AU - James, Laura

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AU - Atz, Andrew M.

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AU - Smith, P. Brian

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for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act–Pediatric Trials Network. An anthropometric survey of US pre-term and full-term neonates. Annals of Human Biology. 2017 Nov 17;44(8):678-686. https://doi.org/10.1080/03014460.2017.1392603