An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Buka Samten, James C. Townsend, Zvjezdana Sever-Chroneos, Virginia Pasquinelli, Peter F. Barnes, Zissis Chroneos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (α-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (α-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (α-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (α-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SPR210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-α but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-γ production by α-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-123
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Leukocyte Biology
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Protein Binding
T-Lymphocytes
Antibodies
Tuberculin
Interleukin-10
Hot Temperature
Staphylococcal Protein A
Neutralizing Antibodies
Cellular Immunity
Interleukin-2
surfactant protein A receptor
Monocytes
Blood Cells
Neck
Up-Regulation
Immunoglobulin G
Western Blotting
Cell Proliferation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Samten, Buka ; Townsend, James C. ; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana ; Pasquinelli, Virginia ; Barnes, Peter F. ; Chroneos, Zissis. / An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 84, No. 1. pp. 115-123.
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abstract = "Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (α-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (α-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90{\%} of monocytes and 5-10{\%} of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (α-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (α-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SPR210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-α but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-γ production by α-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β1.",
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An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. / Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C.; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F.; Chroneos, Zissis.

In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, Vol. 84, No. 1, 01.07.2008, p. 115-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

AU - Samten, Buka

AU - Townsend, James C.

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N2 - Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (α-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (α-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (α-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (α-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SPR210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-α but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-γ production by α-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β1.

AB - Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (α-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (α-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (α-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (α-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SPR210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-α but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-γ production by α-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β1.

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