An Assessment of Neurosurgery Resident Clinical and Socioeconomic Training: The 2013 Council of State Neurosurgical Societies Postresidency Survey Results

James P. Caruso, Owoicho Adogwa, Catherine Mazzola, Michael Steinmetz, Scott D. Simon, Clemens M. Schirmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The Council of State Neurosurgical Societies surveyed neurosurgeons applying for oral board certification in 2008 to assess their preparedness to practice. This survey was repeated in 2013 for a subsequent group of board applicants to evaluate the quality of neurosurgery training and identify opportunities for improvement. Methods: Applicants for the American Board of Neurological Surgeons oral examination from 2008 to 2013 were provided an anonymous survey focused on clinical and socioeconomic skills. Survey responses were compared with the published results of a similar survey using an inferential statistical analysis. Results: In total, 110 of 655 neurosurgeons responded (response rate 16.8%). Significantly more respondents from the 2013 survey felt prepared to perform the following techniques: angiography, endoscopic surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, kyphoplasty, and deep brain stimulation. Significantly more respondents in 2013 attested to receiving appropriate education on Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and pay-for-performance practice models of health care. However, significantly fewer respondents in 2013 felt prepared in open vascular neurosurgery techniques. In both surveys, fewer than 35% of respondents felt adequately prepared in endovascular neurosurgery techniques, medical coding, negotiating an employment contract, and issues regarding practice management and the economics of neurosurgery. Conclusions: The 2013 survey suggests that candidates for board certification in neurosurgery perceive themselves to be adequately prepared to independently perform nearly all neurosurgical procedures. However, additional work is required to optimize neurosurgery training in endovascular procedures and the socioeconomic aspects of neurosurgery practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e28-e36
JournalWorld neurosurgery
Volume151
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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