An electrokinetic PCR chip with in situ electrochemical amplicon detection for comprehensive microbiological analysis of hospital acquired infections

Tingting Liu, Yi Lu, Yujie Sun, Pak Kin Wong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study reports an electrokinetic polymerase chain reaction (EK-PCR) chip that combines long-range electrothermal fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature gradient to implement PCR-based DNA amplification. On-chip electrochemical sensing is also incorporated in the EK-PCR chamber for detecting the amplicon quantitatively. We demonstrate the EK-PCR chip for rapid antibiotic resistance gene detection and multiplex pathogen identification. The EK-PCR process requires only simply electronic interface, is capable of multiplexing, and can be completed in as little as 30 minutes. These unique properties of EK-PCR render its potential use in rapid diagnosis of hospital-acquired infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages63-65
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781510897571
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018 - Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China
Duration: Nov 11 2018Nov 15 2018

Publication series

Name22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018
Volume1

Conference

Conference22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018
CountryTaiwan, Province of China
CityKaohsiung
Period11/11/1811/15/18

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Bioengineering
  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An electrokinetic PCR chip with in situ electrochemical amplicon detection for comprehensive microbiological analysis of hospital acquired infections'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this