An enlarged postcranial sample confirms Australopithecus afarensis dimorphism was similar to modern humans

Philip L. Reno, Melanie A. McCollum, Richard S. Meindl, C. Owen Lovejoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a previous study, we introduced the template method as a means of enlarging the Australopithecus afarensis postcranial sample to more accurately estimate its skeletal dimorphism. Results indicated dimorphism to be largely comparable to that of Homo sapiens. Some have since argued that our results were biased by artificial homogeneity in our Au. afarensis sample. Here we report the results from inclusion of 12 additional, newly reported, specimens. The results are consistent with those of our original study and with the hypothesis that early hominid demographic success derived from a reproductive strategy involving male provisioning of pair-bonded females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3355-3363
Number of pages9
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume365
Issue number1556
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An enlarged postcranial sample confirms Australopithecus afarensis dimorphism was similar to modern humans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this