An enlarged postcranial sample confirms Australopithecus afarensis dimorphism was similar to modern humans

Philip L. Reno, Melanie A. McCollum, Richard S. Meindl, C. Owen Lovejoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a previous study, we introduced the template method as a means of enlarging the Australopithecus afarensis postcranial sample to more accurately estimate its skeletal dimorphism. Results indicated dimorphism to be largely comparable to that of Homo sapiens. Some have since argued that our results were biased by artificial homogeneity in our Au. afarensis sample. Here we report the results from inclusion of 12 additional, newly reported, specimens. The results are consistent with those of our original study and with the hypothesis that early hominid demographic success derived from a reproductive strategy involving male provisioning of pair-bonded females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3355-3363
Number of pages9
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume365
Issue number1556
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2010

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Hominidae
dimorphism
Demography
demographic statistics
sampling
methodology
Homo sapiens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Reno, Philip L. ; McCollum, Melanie A. ; Meindl, Richard S. ; Lovejoy, C. Owen. / An enlarged postcranial sample confirms Australopithecus afarensis dimorphism was similar to modern humans. In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2010 ; Vol. 365, No. 1556. pp. 3355-3363.
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An enlarged postcranial sample confirms Australopithecus afarensis dimorphism was similar to modern humans. / Reno, Philip L.; McCollum, Melanie A.; Meindl, Richard S.; Lovejoy, C. Owen.

In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 365, No. 1556, 27.10.2010, p. 3355-3363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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