An evaluation of the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of African-American men and their female significant others regarding prostate cancer screening

Chanty R. Webb, Linda Kronheim, James E. Williams, Terryl J. Hartman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of African-American men and their female significant others regarding prostate cancer screening. Study flyers and a television interview were used to recruit participants into the study that took place in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Six focus groups were conducted: four with African-American men and two with female significant others. A total of 32 people participated in the study. The groups expressed multiple apprehensions toward prostate cancer screening, including feelings of vulnerability, compromised manhood, and discomfort. They also shared motivators for screening, including female significant others, physician recommendation, early education, and church influence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-238
Number of pages5
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

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