An ex ante analysis of the benefits from the adoption of corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology

Julian M. Alston, Jeffrey Hyde, Michele C. Marra, Paul D. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

If a new corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology had been adopted on all of the United States acres treated for corn rootworm in the year 2000, the total benefits in that year alone would have been $460 million: $171 million to the technology developer and seed companies, $231 million to farmers from yield gains, and a further $58 million to farmers as nonpecuniary benefits associated with reduced use of insecticides. Our nationwide survey of corn producers suggests that initial adoption might be as low as 30%, implying first-year benefits of about $138 million.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-84
Number of pages14
JournalAgBioForum
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

ex ante analysis
rootworms
Zea mays
genetically modified organisms
Technology
corn
seed industry
farmers
national surveys
Insecticides
Seeds
insecticides
Corn

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Alston, J. M., Hyde, J., Marra, M. C., & Mitchell, P. D. (2002). An ex ante analysis of the benefits from the adoption of corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology. AgBioForum, 5(3), 71-84.
Alston, Julian M. ; Hyde, Jeffrey ; Marra, Michele C. ; Mitchell, Paul D. / An ex ante analysis of the benefits from the adoption of corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology. In: AgBioForum. 2002 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 71-84.
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Alston, JM, Hyde, J, Marra, MC & Mitchell, PD 2002, 'An ex ante analysis of the benefits from the adoption of corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology', AgBioForum, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 71-84.

An ex ante analysis of the benefits from the adoption of corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology. / Alston, Julian M.; Hyde, Jeffrey; Marra, Michele C.; Mitchell, Paul D.

In: AgBioForum, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.12.2002, p. 71-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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