An examination of endoparasites and fecal testosterone levels in flying squirrels (Glaucomys spp.) using high performance liquid chromatography-ultra-violet (HPLC-UV)

Sarah N. Waksmonski, Justin Michael Huffman, Carolyn Grace Mahan, Michael A. Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The immuno-competence hypothesis proposes that higher levels of testosterone increases the susceptibility to parasitism. Here we examined the testosterone levels in two species of flying squirrels (Glaucomys): one known to regularly host a nematode species (Strongyloides robustus) without ill effects (G. volans) and a closely related species that is considered negatively affected by the parasite. We quantified fecal testosterone levels in northern and southern flying squirrels (G. sabrinus, G. volans) with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet spectroscopy (HPLC-UV), and compared levels to endoparasites detected in individual squirrels. Qualitatively, we found highest levels of testosterone in male northern flying squirrels infected with Strongyloides robustus. This analytical approach represents an alternative and equally reliable method to using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for detecting and quantifying fecal testosterone levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-137
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Glaucomys
ultra-performance liquid chromatography
Sciuridae
endoparasites
squirrels
testosterone
Testosterone
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Glaucomys volans
Glaucomys sabrinus
Strongyloides
ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy
immunocompetence
Mental Competency
Spectrum Analysis
parasitism
Parasites
high performance liquid chromatography
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Nematoda

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "An examination of endoparasites and fecal testosterone levels in flying squirrels (Glaucomys spp.) using high performance liquid chromatography-ultra-violet (HPLC-UV)",
abstract = "The immuno-competence hypothesis proposes that higher levels of testosterone increases the susceptibility to parasitism. Here we examined the testosterone levels in two species of flying squirrels (Glaucomys): one known to regularly host a nematode species (Strongyloides robustus) without ill effects (G. volans) and a closely related species that is considered negatively affected by the parasite. We quantified fecal testosterone levels in northern and southern flying squirrels (G. sabrinus, G. volans) with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet spectroscopy (HPLC-UV), and compared levels to endoparasites detected in individual squirrels. Qualitatively, we found highest levels of testosterone in male northern flying squirrels infected with Strongyloides robustus. This analytical approach represents an alternative and equally reliable method to using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for detecting and quantifying fecal testosterone levels.",
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