An examination of how academic advancement of U.S. journalism students relates to their degree motivations, values, and technology use

Serena Carpenter, Anne Hoag, August E. Grant, Brian J. Bowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The newsroom is a powerful influence in a journalist’s identity formation. Research has yet to verify the socializing impact of academia. This research utilized the quantitative survey method applying it to undergraduate journalism students (n=798) to assess how academic status relates to students’ degree motivations, life values, and technology use. The results show advancement is related to variations in perceptions of some degree motivations, which include perceiving journalism as a path to write and fame, but life values were not significantly different. The implication of this study suggests that academia may not have much impact on certain perceptions and behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-74
Number of pages17
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Educator
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Education

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