An examination of Petromyzontidae in Pennsylvania

Current distribution and habitat preference of lampreys

Shan Li, Karl M. Werner, Jay Richard Stauffer, Jr.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Native populations of lampreys are declining throughout the Great Lakes drainage basin due to habitat loss and degradation, anthropogenic stresses, and stream treatment with lampricides to control the exotic Petromyzon marinus (Sea Lamprey). We surveyed 19 streams across Pennsylvania to determine the presence/absence of six species that were historically found there. In 2011, we found four species-Lamptera aepyptera (Least Brook Lamprey), Lethenteron appendix (American Brook Lamprey), Ichthyomyzon greeleyi (Mountain Brook Lamprey), and Sea Lamprey-in 14 creeks statewide. In 2012, we found three species-Least Brook Lamprey, American Brook Lamprey, and Mountain Brook Lamprey-in 8 creeks in the Allegheny watershed. Lampreys appeared to be extirpated at some sites. Historically, Ichthyomyzon bdellium (Ohio Lamprey) and Ichthyomyzon fossor (Northern Brook Lamprey) were reported, but we did not observe these species during our study. Substrate analysis indicated ammocoetes preferred substrates with a particle diameter of <0.3 mm in shallow, warm water. In tributaries of Lake Erie, lampricide treatment to control Sea Lamprey may be a major reason for the population decline of native lamprey species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-618
Number of pages13
JournalNortheastern Naturalist
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Petromyzontidae
Petromyzontiformes
habitat preferences
habitat selection
Ichthyomyzon
Petromyzon marinus
Lampetra appendix
substrate
mountains
mountain
lake
habitat loss
population decline
Lake Erie
distribution
brook
warm water
drainage basin
native species
Great Lakes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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title = "An examination of Petromyzontidae in Pennsylvania: Current distribution and habitat preference of lampreys",
abstract = "Native populations of lampreys are declining throughout the Great Lakes drainage basin due to habitat loss and degradation, anthropogenic stresses, and stream treatment with lampricides to control the exotic Petromyzon marinus (Sea Lamprey). We surveyed 19 streams across Pennsylvania to determine the presence/absence of six species that were historically found there. In 2011, we found four species-Lamptera aepyptera (Least Brook Lamprey), Lethenteron appendix (American Brook Lamprey), Ichthyomyzon greeleyi (Mountain Brook Lamprey), and Sea Lamprey-in 14 creeks statewide. In 2012, we found three species-Least Brook Lamprey, American Brook Lamprey, and Mountain Brook Lamprey-in 8 creeks in the Allegheny watershed. Lampreys appeared to be extirpated at some sites. Historically, Ichthyomyzon bdellium (Ohio Lamprey) and Ichthyomyzon fossor (Northern Brook Lamprey) were reported, but we did not observe these species during our study. Substrate analysis indicated ammocoetes preferred substrates with a particle diameter of <0.3 mm in shallow, warm water. In tributaries of Lake Erie, lampricide treatment to control Sea Lamprey may be a major reason for the population decline of native lamprey species.",
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An examination of Petromyzontidae in Pennsylvania : Current distribution and habitat preference of lampreys. / Li, Shan; Werner, Karl M.; Stauffer, Jr., Jay Richard.

In: Northeastern Naturalist, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 606-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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