An Experimental Investigation of Antisocial Lie-Telling Among Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Typically Developing Children

Allison P. Mugno, Lindsay C. Malloy, Daniel Waschbusch, William E. Pelham, Victoria Talwar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children's lie-telling is surprisingly understudied among children with significant behavioral problems. In the present study, experimental paradigms were used to examine antisocial lie-telling among ethnically diverse 5- to 10-year-old children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD; n = 71) and a typically developing (TD) comparison sample (n = 50) recruited from a southeastern state from 2013 to 2014. Children completed two games that measured the prevalence and skill of their lies: (a) for personal gain and (b) to conceal wrongdoing. Children with DBD were more likely to lie for personal gain than TD children. With age, children were more likely to lie to conceal wrongdoing, but the reverse was true regarding lies for personal gain. Results advance knowledge concerning individual differences in children's lie-telling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)774-789
Number of pages16
JournalChild development
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
behavior disorder
Individuality
paradigm

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Mugno, Allison P. ; Malloy, Lindsay C. ; Waschbusch, Daniel ; Pelham, William E. ; Talwar, Victoria. / An Experimental Investigation of Antisocial Lie-Telling Among Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Typically Developing Children. In: Child development. 2019 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 774-789.
@article{2e5c6ef76a544f0b91e98c8c03da488a,
title = "An Experimental Investigation of Antisocial Lie-Telling Among Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Typically Developing Children",
abstract = "Children's lie-telling is surprisingly understudied among children with significant behavioral problems. In the present study, experimental paradigms were used to examine antisocial lie-telling among ethnically diverse 5- to 10-year-old children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD; n = 71) and a typically developing (TD) comparison sample (n = 50) recruited from a southeastern state from 2013 to 2014. Children completed two games that measured the prevalence and skill of their lies: (a) for personal gain and (b) to conceal wrongdoing. Children with DBD were more likely to lie for personal gain than TD children. With age, children were more likely to lie to conceal wrongdoing, but the reverse was true regarding lies for personal gain. Results advance knowledge concerning individual differences in children's lie-telling.",
author = "Mugno, {Allison P.} and Malloy, {Lindsay C.} and Daniel Waschbusch and Pelham, {William E.} and Victoria Talwar",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/cdev.12985",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "774--789",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

An Experimental Investigation of Antisocial Lie-Telling Among Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Typically Developing Children. / Mugno, Allison P.; Malloy, Lindsay C.; Waschbusch, Daniel; Pelham, William E.; Talwar, Victoria.

In: Child development, Vol. 90, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 774-789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An Experimental Investigation of Antisocial Lie-Telling Among Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Typically Developing Children

AU - Mugno, Allison P.

AU - Malloy, Lindsay C.

AU - Waschbusch, Daniel

AU - Pelham, William E.

AU - Talwar, Victoria

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Children's lie-telling is surprisingly understudied among children with significant behavioral problems. In the present study, experimental paradigms were used to examine antisocial lie-telling among ethnically diverse 5- to 10-year-old children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD; n = 71) and a typically developing (TD) comparison sample (n = 50) recruited from a southeastern state from 2013 to 2014. Children completed two games that measured the prevalence and skill of their lies: (a) for personal gain and (b) to conceal wrongdoing. Children with DBD were more likely to lie for personal gain than TD children. With age, children were more likely to lie to conceal wrongdoing, but the reverse was true regarding lies for personal gain. Results advance knowledge concerning individual differences in children's lie-telling.

AB - Children's lie-telling is surprisingly understudied among children with significant behavioral problems. In the present study, experimental paradigms were used to examine antisocial lie-telling among ethnically diverse 5- to 10-year-old children with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD; n = 71) and a typically developing (TD) comparison sample (n = 50) recruited from a southeastern state from 2013 to 2014. Children completed two games that measured the prevalence and skill of their lies: (a) for personal gain and (b) to conceal wrongdoing. Children with DBD were more likely to lie for personal gain than TD children. With age, children were more likely to lie to conceal wrongdoing, but the reverse was true regarding lies for personal gain. Results advance knowledge concerning individual differences in children's lie-telling.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060740421&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060740421&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/cdev.12985

DO - 10.1111/cdev.12985

M3 - Article

C2 - 29076552

AN - SCOPUS:85060740421

VL - 90

SP - 774

EP - 789

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 3

ER -