An experimental study of permeability and fluid chemistry in an artificially jointed marble

Chris J. Marone, J. Rubenstone, James Terry Engelder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine the amount of rock dissolution accompanying changes in joint permeability, deionized water was forced through axially split cylindrical samples of Vermont marble, subjected to a confining pressure of 60 MPa. For freshly polished surfaces, permeability decreased and fluid chemical concentrations increased during the first 50 to 100 hours of fluid flow. For the water-etched surfaces, permeability was not time dependent, and a steady state chemical composition was reached after 20 to 40 hours. A calculation of the steady state chemical concentrations for coexisting calcite and dolomite in deionized water, at a fluid pressure of 10 MPa and a confining pressure of 60 MPa, shows that the steady state values reached in our experiments were supersaturated. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume93
Issue numberB11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Fingerprint

Marble
Calcium Carbonate
marble
permeability
chemical concentration
chemistry
experimental study
Deionized water
confining pressure
confining
Fluids
fluid
fluids
slickenside
fluid pressure
dolomite
water
Calcite
calcite
surface water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

@article{6960d43fdd354c5091da6f7565a15df9,
title = "An experimental study of permeability and fluid chemistry in an artificially jointed marble",
abstract = "To examine the amount of rock dissolution accompanying changes in joint permeability, deionized water was forced through axially split cylindrical samples of Vermont marble, subjected to a confining pressure of 60 MPa. For freshly polished surfaces, permeability decreased and fluid chemical concentrations increased during the first 50 to 100 hours of fluid flow. For the water-etched surfaces, permeability was not time dependent, and a steady state chemical composition was reached after 20 to 40 hours. A calculation of the steady state chemical concentrations for coexisting calcite and dolomite in deionized water, at a fluid pressure of 10 MPa and a confining pressure of 60 MPa, shows that the steady state values reached in our experiments were supersaturated. -from Authors",
author = "Marone, {Chris J.} and J. Rubenstone and Engelder, {James Terry}",
year = "1988",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "93",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research",
issn = "0148-0227",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
number = "B11",

}

An experimental study of permeability and fluid chemistry in an artificially jointed marble. / Marone, Chris J.; Rubenstone, J.; Engelder, James Terry.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 93, No. B11, 01.01.1988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An experimental study of permeability and fluid chemistry in an artificially jointed marble

AU - Marone, Chris J.

AU - Rubenstone, J.

AU - Engelder, James Terry

PY - 1988/1/1

Y1 - 1988/1/1

N2 - To examine the amount of rock dissolution accompanying changes in joint permeability, deionized water was forced through axially split cylindrical samples of Vermont marble, subjected to a confining pressure of 60 MPa. For freshly polished surfaces, permeability decreased and fluid chemical concentrations increased during the first 50 to 100 hours of fluid flow. For the water-etched surfaces, permeability was not time dependent, and a steady state chemical composition was reached after 20 to 40 hours. A calculation of the steady state chemical concentrations for coexisting calcite and dolomite in deionized water, at a fluid pressure of 10 MPa and a confining pressure of 60 MPa, shows that the steady state values reached in our experiments were supersaturated. -from Authors

AB - To examine the amount of rock dissolution accompanying changes in joint permeability, deionized water was forced through axially split cylindrical samples of Vermont marble, subjected to a confining pressure of 60 MPa. For freshly polished surfaces, permeability decreased and fluid chemical concentrations increased during the first 50 to 100 hours of fluid flow. For the water-etched surfaces, permeability was not time dependent, and a steady state chemical composition was reached after 20 to 40 hours. A calculation of the steady state chemical concentrations for coexisting calcite and dolomite in deionized water, at a fluid pressure of 10 MPa and a confining pressure of 60 MPa, shows that the steady state values reached in our experiments were supersaturated. -from Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024226130&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024226130&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 93

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

SN - 0148-0227

IS - B11

ER -