An Experimental Test of Deviant Modeling

Owen Gallupe, Holly Nguyen, Martin Bouchard, Jennifer L. Schulenberg, Allison Chenier, Katie D. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Test the effect of deviant peer modeling on theft as conditioned by verbal support for theft and number of deviant models. Methods: Two related randomized experiments in which participants were given a chance to steal a gift card (ostensibly worth CAN$15) from the table in front of them. Each experiment had a control group, a verbal prompting group in which confederate(s) endorsed stealing, a behavioral modeling group in which confederate(s) committed theft, and a verbal prompting plus behavioral modeling group in which confederate(s) did both. The first experiment used one confederate; the second experiment used two. The pooled sample consisted of 335 undergraduate students. Results: Participants in the verbal prompting plus behavioral modeling group were most likely to steal followed by the behavioral modeling group. Interestingly, behavioral modeling was only influential when two confederates were present. There were no thefts in either the control or verbal prompting groups regardless of the number of confederates. Conclusions: Behavioral modeling appears to be the key mechanism, though verbal support can strengthen the effect of behavioral modeling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-505
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Research in Crime and Delinquency
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Theft
Gift Giving
Students
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Gallupe, O., Nguyen, H., Bouchard, M., Schulenberg, J. L., Chenier, A., & Cook, K. D. (2015). An Experimental Test of Deviant Modeling. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 53(4), 482-505. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022427815625093
Gallupe, Owen ; Nguyen, Holly ; Bouchard, Martin ; Schulenberg, Jennifer L. ; Chenier, Allison ; Cook, Katie D. / An Experimental Test of Deviant Modeling. In: Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency. 2015 ; Vol. 53, No. 4. pp. 482-505.
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Gallupe, O, Nguyen, H, Bouchard, M, Schulenberg, JL, Chenier, A & Cook, KD 2015, 'An Experimental Test of Deviant Modeling', Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 482-505. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022427815625093

An Experimental Test of Deviant Modeling. / Gallupe, Owen; Nguyen, Holly; Bouchard, Martin; Schulenberg, Jennifer L.; Chenier, Allison; Cook, Katie D.

In: Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 53, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 482-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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