An Exploratory Analysis of Child Feeding Beliefs and Behaviors Included in Food Blogs Written by Mothers of Preschool-Aged Children

Allison E. Doub, Meg Leavy Small, Leann Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study analyzed child feeding beliefs and behaviors, types of recipes, and their associations in blogs focused on child feeding. Design: The authors selected 13 blogs using purposive snowball sampling, from which 158 blog posts were sampled and coded using directed qualitative content analysis. Variables Measured: Child feeding beliefs and behaviors and types of recipes were coded using schemes developed from existing literature. Analysis: Code frequencies were calculated. Chi-square tests for independence examined associations between child feeding and recipe codes. Bonferroni corrections were applied: P < .05/(tests). Results: Child feeding beliefs and behaviors were coded in 78% and 49% of posts, respectively. Beliefs about children's food preferences (48% of posts) and involving children in food preparation (27% of posts) were the most frequent codes. Recipes were included in 66% of posts. Most recipes were for mixed dishes (32% of recipes), followed by sweets and desserts (19% of recipes). Vegetable recipes were more likely in posts that included behavior encouraging balance and variety (χ2 [1, n = 104] = 18.54; P < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Blog posts contained information that may influence readers' child feeding practices. Future research should explore how mothers use blogs to learn about child feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-103.e1
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Blogging
Child Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Preschool Children
Mothers
Food
Food Preferences
Chi-Square Distribution
Vegetables

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "An Exploratory Analysis of Child Feeding Beliefs and Behaviors Included in Food Blogs Written by Mothers of Preschool-Aged Children",
abstract = "Objective: This study analyzed child feeding beliefs and behaviors, types of recipes, and their associations in blogs focused on child feeding. Design: The authors selected 13 blogs using purposive snowball sampling, from which 158 blog posts were sampled and coded using directed qualitative content analysis. Variables Measured: Child feeding beliefs and behaviors and types of recipes were coded using schemes developed from existing literature. Analysis: Code frequencies were calculated. Chi-square tests for independence examined associations between child feeding and recipe codes. Bonferroni corrections were applied: P < .05/(tests). Results: Child feeding beliefs and behaviors were coded in 78{\%} and 49{\%} of posts, respectively. Beliefs about children's food preferences (48{\%} of posts) and involving children in food preparation (27{\%} of posts) were the most frequent codes. Recipes were included in 66{\%} of posts. Most recipes were for mixed dishes (32{\%} of recipes), followed by sweets and desserts (19{\%} of recipes). Vegetable recipes were more likely in posts that included behavior encouraging balance and variety (χ2 [1, n = 104] = 18.54; P < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Blog posts contained information that may influence readers' child feeding practices. Future research should explore how mothers use blogs to learn about child feeding.",
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An Exploratory Analysis of Child Feeding Beliefs and Behaviors Included in Food Blogs Written by Mothers of Preschool-Aged Children. / Doub, Allison E.; Small, Meg Leavy; Birch, Leann.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 93-103.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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