An increase in dietary n-3 fatty acids decreases a marker of bone resorption in humans

Amy E. Griel, Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Kirsten F. Hilpert, Guixiang Zhao, Sheila G. West, Rebecca L. Corwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human, animal, and in vitro research indicates a beneficial effect of appropriate amounts of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on bone health. This is the first controlled feeding study in humans to evaluate the effect of dietary plant-derived n-3 PUFA on bone turnover, assessed by serum concentrations of N-telopeptides (NTx) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP). Subjects (n = 23) consumed each diet for 6 weeks in a randomized, 3-period crossover design: 1) Average American Diet (AAD; [34% total fat, 13% saturated fatty acids (SFA), 13% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), 9% PUFA (7.7% LA, 0.8% ALA)]), 2) Linoleic Acid Diet (LA; [37% total fat, 9% SFA, 12% MUFA, 16% PUFA (12.6% LA, 3.6% ALA)]), and 3) α-Linolenic Acid Diet (ALA; [38% total fat, 8% SFA, 12% MUFA, 17% PUFA (10.5% LA, 6.5% ALA)]). Walnuts and flaxseed oil were the predominant sources of ALA. NTx levels were significantly lower following the ALA diet (13.20 ± 1.21 nM BCE), relative to the AAD (15.59 ± 1.21 nM BCE) (p < 0.05). Mean NTx level following the LA diet was 13.80 ± 1.21 nM BCE. There was no change in levels of BSAP across the three diets. Concentrations of NTx were positively correlated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα for all three diets. The results indicate that plant sources of dietary n-3 PUFA may have a protective effect on bone metabolism via a decrease in bone resorption in the presence of consistent levels of bone formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2
JournalNutrition Journal
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Bone Resorption
Diet
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Bone and Bones
Fatty Acids
Fats
Alkaline Phosphatase
Linseed Oil
Juglans
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Bone Remodeling
Linoleic Acid
Osteogenesis
Cross-Over Studies
Cytokines
Health
Serum
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Griel, Amy E. ; Kris-Etherton, Penny M. ; Hilpert, Kirsten F. ; Zhao, Guixiang ; West, Sheila G. ; Corwin, Rebecca L. / An increase in dietary n-3 fatty acids decreases a marker of bone resorption in humans. In: Nutrition Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 6.
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abstract = "Human, animal, and in vitro research indicates a beneficial effect of appropriate amounts of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on bone health. This is the first controlled feeding study in humans to evaluate the effect of dietary plant-derived n-3 PUFA on bone turnover, assessed by serum concentrations of N-telopeptides (NTx) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP). Subjects (n = 23) consumed each diet for 6 weeks in a randomized, 3-period crossover design: 1) Average American Diet (AAD; [34{\%} total fat, 13{\%} saturated fatty acids (SFA), 13{\%} monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), 9{\%} PUFA (7.7{\%} LA, 0.8{\%} ALA)]), 2) Linoleic Acid Diet (LA; [37{\%} total fat, 9{\%} SFA, 12{\%} MUFA, 16{\%} PUFA (12.6{\%} LA, 3.6{\%} ALA)]), and 3) α-Linolenic Acid Diet (ALA; [38{\%} total fat, 8{\%} SFA, 12{\%} MUFA, 17{\%} PUFA (10.5{\%} LA, 6.5{\%} ALA)]). Walnuts and flaxseed oil were the predominant sources of ALA. NTx levels were significantly lower following the ALA diet (13.20 ± 1.21 nM BCE), relative to the AAD (15.59 ± 1.21 nM BCE) (p < 0.05). Mean NTx level following the LA diet was 13.80 ± 1.21 nM BCE. There was no change in levels of BSAP across the three diets. Concentrations of NTx were positively correlated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα for all three diets. The results indicate that plant sources of dietary n-3 PUFA may have a protective effect on bone metabolism via a decrease in bone resorption in the presence of consistent levels of bone formation.",
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An increase in dietary n-3 fatty acids decreases a marker of bone resorption in humans. / Griel, Amy E.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Hilpert, Kirsten F.; Zhao, Guixiang; West, Sheila G.; Corwin, Rebecca L.

In: Nutrition Journal, Vol. 6, 2, 01.01.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

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