An induced energy analysis to determine the mechanism for performance enhancement as a result of arm swing during jumping

Zachary J. Domire, John Henry Challis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arm swing during a jump can enhance performance. This study examined the mechanisms via which arm swing contributes to maximum vertical jump height. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain how jump height can be increased by arm swing: production of additional energy or slow leg extension which may permit muscles to work on a more favorable region of the force-velocity curve. A simulation model of the vertical jump and an induced energy analysis were used to determine the contribution of each of these mechanisms. The results from the model suggest that both mechanisms for the role of arm swing in enhancing jump performance are at play. Arm swing did slow the hip extensors allowing for more force production from these muscles. The work done and the energy induced in the vertical direction by these muscles were greater in the jump simulated with arm swing. However, these increases were not sufficient to explain the entire improvement in jumping performance. The shoulder musculature generated a considerable amount of work and energy induced and is directly responsible for approximately one-third of the performance enhancement associated with arm swing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-46
Number of pages9
JournalSports Biomechanics
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Arm
Muscles
Hip
Leg

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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An induced energy analysis to determine the mechanism for performance enhancement as a result of arm swing during jumping. / Domire, Zachary J.; Challis, John Henry.

In: Sports Biomechanics, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 38-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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