An interleukin-1 receptor fragment inhibits spontaneous sleep and muramyl dipeptide-induced sleep in rabbits

Satoshi Takahashi, Levente Kapás, Jidong Fang, Jerome M. Seyer, Ying Wang, James M. Krueger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is hypothesized to be involved in physiological sleep regulation and in sleep responses occurring during infectious disease. If this hypothesis is correct then inhibition of endogenous IL-1 should reduce both normal sleep and N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP)- induced sleep. MDP is a somnogenic substance derived from bacterial cell walls. We report here the effects of a synthetic IL-1 receptor fragment corresponding to amino acid residues 86-95 of the human type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RF) on spontaneous sleep and IL-1β- and MDP-induced sleep and fever in rabbits. Two doses of the IL-1RF (25 and 50 μg) were injected into normal rabbits intracerebroventricularly (icv). Both doses significantly decreased spontaneous non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) across a 22-h recording period. Pretreatment of rabbits with 25 μg of IL-1RF blocked the somnogenic actions of 10 ng icv IL-1. Similarly, central pretreatment of animals with 25 μg IL-1RF significantly attenuated the NREMS-promoting and REMS-suppressive actions of 150 pmol MDP injected centrally. The increase in NREMS and decrease in REMS induced by systemic injection of 12.5 μg/kg MDP were also significantly suppressed by central administration of 50 μg IL-1RF. In contrast, the febrile responses induced by either intracerebroventricularly or intravenously injected MDP were not significantly affected by IL-1RF. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous, brain-derived IL-1 contributes to the maintenance of normal sleep and may mediate sleep responses to systemic as well as central bacterial infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume271
Issue number1 40-1
StatePublished - Jul 1 1996

Fingerprint

Acetylmuramyl-Alanyl-Isoglutamine
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Sleep
Rabbits
Interleukin-1
Eye Movements
Fever
Interleukin-1 Type I Receptors
Bacterial Infections
Cell Wall
Communicable Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "An interleukin-1 receptor fragment inhibits spontaneous sleep and muramyl dipeptide-induced sleep in rabbits",
abstract = "Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is hypothesized to be involved in physiological sleep regulation and in sleep responses occurring during infectious disease. If this hypothesis is correct then inhibition of endogenous IL-1 should reduce both normal sleep and N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP)- induced sleep. MDP is a somnogenic substance derived from bacterial cell walls. We report here the effects of a synthetic IL-1 receptor fragment corresponding to amino acid residues 86-95 of the human type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RF) on spontaneous sleep and IL-1β- and MDP-induced sleep and fever in rabbits. Two doses of the IL-1RF (25 and 50 μg) were injected into normal rabbits intracerebroventricularly (icv). Both doses significantly decreased spontaneous non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) across a 22-h recording period. Pretreatment of rabbits with 25 μg of IL-1RF blocked the somnogenic actions of 10 ng icv IL-1. Similarly, central pretreatment of animals with 25 μg IL-1RF significantly attenuated the NREMS-promoting and REMS-suppressive actions of 150 pmol MDP injected centrally. The increase in NREMS and decrease in REMS induced by systemic injection of 12.5 μg/kg MDP were also significantly suppressed by central administration of 50 μg IL-1RF. In contrast, the febrile responses induced by either intracerebroventricularly or intravenously injected MDP were not significantly affected by IL-1RF. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous, brain-derived IL-1 contributes to the maintenance of normal sleep and may mediate sleep responses to systemic as well as central bacterial infections.",
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An interleukin-1 receptor fragment inhibits spontaneous sleep and muramyl dipeptide-induced sleep in rabbits. / Takahashi, Satoshi; Kapás, Levente; Fang, Jidong; Seyer, Jerome M.; Wang, Ying; Krueger, James M.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 271, No. 1 40-1, 01.07.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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