An investigation into interdisciplinary team teaching in writing and engineering: A multi-year study

Frances S. Johnson, David Hutto, Kevin Dahm, Anthony J. Marchese, Carlos Sun, Eric Constans, Kathryn Hollar, Paris Von Lockette

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Sophomore Engineering Clinic I is the third course in an 8-semester multidisciplinary engineering practice and design sequence taken by all engineering students at Rowan University. This course is taught jointly by a team of faculty from the College of Communications and all four departments within the College of Engineering. The Sophomore Clinic students receive classroom training in technical communication and in the engineering design process, and work on design projects in multidisciplinary teams of 3-4 students. This paper presents the second year results of an on-going experiment involving the integration of technical writing and engineering design in Sophomore Engineering Clinic I. The highlights of this experiment include: 1) Comparing sections which are jointly taught by engineering and writing faculty with sections solely taught by writing faculty, 2) Tracking the effectiveness of increasing active engineering faculty participation in writing instruction over multiple semesters, and 3) Fully integrating engineering design and communication deliverables and grading. Time series data from student surveys and faculty assessments are analyzed to investigate the effectiveness of the integrated teaching efforts. In addition, the nature, quality, and definitions of the interdisciplinary team teaching as seen from the perspective of the professors and the students are assessed. The results of this on-going study show that rectifying student misconceptions on the duality of engineering and writing requires active interdisciplinary team teaching efforts and full integration across all course aspects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1899-1906
Number of pages8
JournalASEE Annual Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Event2001 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Peppers, Papers, Pueblos and Professors - Albuquerque, NM, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2001Jun 27 2001

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Teaching
Students
Communication
Technical writing
Time series
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Johnson, Frances S. ; Hutto, David ; Dahm, Kevin ; Marchese, Anthony J. ; Sun, Carlos ; Constans, Eric ; Hollar, Kathryn ; Von Lockette, Paris. / An investigation into interdisciplinary team teaching in writing and engineering : A multi-year study. In: ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings. 2001 ; pp. 1899-1906.
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abstract = "The Sophomore Engineering Clinic I is the third course in an 8-semester multidisciplinary engineering practice and design sequence taken by all engineering students at Rowan University. This course is taught jointly by a team of faculty from the College of Communications and all four departments within the College of Engineering. The Sophomore Clinic students receive classroom training in technical communication and in the engineering design process, and work on design projects in multidisciplinary teams of 3-4 students. This paper presents the second year results of an on-going experiment involving the integration of technical writing and engineering design in Sophomore Engineering Clinic I. The highlights of this experiment include: 1) Comparing sections which are jointly taught by engineering and writing faculty with sections solely taught by writing faculty, 2) Tracking the effectiveness of increasing active engineering faculty participation in writing instruction over multiple semesters, and 3) Fully integrating engineering design and communication deliverables and grading. Time series data from student surveys and faculty assessments are analyzed to investigate the effectiveness of the integrated teaching efforts. In addition, the nature, quality, and definitions of the interdisciplinary team teaching as seen from the perspective of the professors and the students are assessed. The results of this on-going study show that rectifying student misconceptions on the duality of engineering and writing requires active interdisciplinary team teaching efforts and full integration across all course aspects.",
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Johnson, FS, Hutto, D, Dahm, K, Marchese, AJ, Sun, C, Constans, E, Hollar, K & Von Lockette, P 2001, 'An investigation into interdisciplinary team teaching in writing and engineering: A multi-year study', ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings, pp. 1899-1906.

An investigation into interdisciplinary team teaching in writing and engineering : A multi-year study. / Johnson, Frances S.; Hutto, David; Dahm, Kevin; Marchese, Anthony J.; Sun, Carlos; Constans, Eric; Hollar, Kathryn; Von Lockette, Paris.

In: ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings, 01.12.2001, p. 1899-1906.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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Johnson FS, Hutto D, Dahm K, Marchese AJ, Sun C, Constans E et al. An investigation into interdisciplinary team teaching in writing and engineering: A multi-year study. ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings. 2001 Dec 1;1899-1906.