An investigation into the role of lipid peroxidation in the mode of action of aromatic hydrocarbon and dicarboximide fungicides

Ann B. Orth, Angelo Sfarra, Eva J. Pell, Ming Tien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mode of actio of aromatic hydrocarbon and dicarboximide fungicides has been the subject of many studies which have not conclusively identified the primary target site. One current theory proposes that active oxygen species generated by these compounds initiate lipid peroxidation. We studied the effects of two aromatic hydrocarbons, chloroneb and tolclophos-methyl, and three dicarboximides, vinclozolin, iprodione, and myclozoline, on microsomes of Ustilago maydis. As a control, we compared the effect of paraquat, which is known to generate active oxygen, with that of these fungicides. Growth of U. maydis is very sensitive to all five compounds under study, especially to tolchlophos-methyl (I50 = 0.3 μg/ml). No lipid peroxidation occurred in the fungal microsomes when treated with the fungicides. In fact, no peroxidation was observed when the fungal microsomes were treated with a potent oxidation system of ascorbate iron. This may be explained by the lack of highly polyunsaturated fatty acids in this fungus. Whereas paraquat caused the uncoupling of electron flow in U. maydis microsomes as demonstrated by NADPH oxidation and O2 consumption, no effect was observed upon treatment with the fungicides. These compounds also did not inhibit NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase activity. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation as the primary mode of action of these compounds is unlikely in this organism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalPesticide Biochemistry and Physiology
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

dicarboximide fungicides
Aromatic Hydrocarbons
aromatic hydrocarbons
microsomes
Ustilago zeae
Microsomes
Lipid Peroxidation
mechanism of action
lipid peroxidation
fungicides
vinclozolin
Paraquat
iprodione
paraquat
NADP (coenzyme)
chloroneb
Reactive Oxygen Species
Ustilago
oxidation
NADPH-Ferrihemoprotein Reductase

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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abstract = "The mode of actio of aromatic hydrocarbon and dicarboximide fungicides has been the subject of many studies which have not conclusively identified the primary target site. One current theory proposes that active oxygen species generated by these compounds initiate lipid peroxidation. We studied the effects of two aromatic hydrocarbons, chloroneb and tolclophos-methyl, and three dicarboximides, vinclozolin, iprodione, and myclozoline, on microsomes of Ustilago maydis. As a control, we compared the effect of paraquat, which is known to generate active oxygen, with that of these fungicides. Growth of U. maydis is very sensitive to all five compounds under study, especially to tolchlophos-methyl (I50 = 0.3 μg/ml). No lipid peroxidation occurred in the fungal microsomes when treated with the fungicides. In fact, no peroxidation was observed when the fungal microsomes were treated with a potent oxidation system of ascorbate iron. This may be explained by the lack of highly polyunsaturated fatty acids in this fungus. Whereas paraquat caused the uncoupling of electron flow in U. maydis microsomes as demonstrated by NADPH oxidation and O2 consumption, no effect was observed upon treatment with the fungicides. These compounds also did not inhibit NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase activity. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation as the primary mode of action of these compounds is unlikely in this organism.",
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An investigation into the role of lipid peroxidation in the mode of action of aromatic hydrocarbon and dicarboximide fungicides. / Orth, Ann B.; Sfarra, Angelo; Pell, Eva J.; Tien, Ming.

In: Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, Vol. 44, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 91-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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