Analysis of tars formed during co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass at high temperature in carbon dioxide atmosphere

Aime H. Tchapda, Vijayaragavan Krishnamoorthy, Yaw D. Yeboah, Sarma V. Pisupati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The analysis of tars from the high temperature (1573 K–1773 K) co-pyrolysis of coal (Pittsburgh #8) and biomass (Switchgrass and White Pine) in CO2 has been carried out. The analysis shows that naphthalene content is the maximum in all the tar samples irrespective of biomass and coal blend proportion. Samples with high percentages of coal as well as experiments conducted at 1773 K showed the highest concentration of aromatic compounds. The largest aromatic compound found had five benzene rings (benzo(e)pyrene). Aliphatic hydrocarbons as well as oxygenated hydrocarbons were mostly found in samples containing high percentages of biomass or in experiments conducted at 1573 K. About 100 compounds have been identified in the tars of which 25% account for 90% of the mass of tar. The study indicates that the atomic N/C and S/C ratio increases whereas H/C ratio decreases with pyrolysis temperature. The rate of variation of H/C ratio reduces as the temperature increases. The biomass content in the fuel feed seems to have an impact on the H/C ratio of the tars only at lower temperatures. That is, at lower temperatures, the higher the biomass content of the fuel, the higher the H/C ratio of the resulting tars. These observations also apply to the O/C ratio of the tar. For both switchgrass and pine sawdust, the biomass content of the fuel seems to have no influence on the nitrogen content of the tars. The distribution of sulfur in the tar is inversely proportional to the biomass percentage in the fuel. The higher the biomass content of the fuel, the lower the atomic S/C of the tars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-396
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis
Volume128
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Tars
Coal
Tar
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon dioxide
Biomass
Pyrolysis
Temperature
Aromatic compounds
Hydrocarbons
Sawdust
Pyrene
Naphthalene
Benzene
Sulfur
Nitrogen
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

@article{18a60b0533814094ad3dc43fa7072ea8,
title = "Analysis of tars formed during co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass at high temperature in carbon dioxide atmosphere",
abstract = "The analysis of tars from the high temperature (1573 K–1773 K) co-pyrolysis of coal (Pittsburgh #8) and biomass (Switchgrass and White Pine) in CO2 has been carried out. The analysis shows that naphthalene content is the maximum in all the tar samples irrespective of biomass and coal blend proportion. Samples with high percentages of coal as well as experiments conducted at 1773 K showed the highest concentration of aromatic compounds. The largest aromatic compound found had five benzene rings (benzo(e)pyrene). Aliphatic hydrocarbons as well as oxygenated hydrocarbons were mostly found in samples containing high percentages of biomass or in experiments conducted at 1573 K. About 100 compounds have been identified in the tars of which 25{\%} account for 90{\%} of the mass of tar. The study indicates that the atomic N/C and S/C ratio increases whereas H/C ratio decreases with pyrolysis temperature. The rate of variation of H/C ratio reduces as the temperature increases. The biomass content in the fuel feed seems to have an impact on the H/C ratio of the tars only at lower temperatures. That is, at lower temperatures, the higher the biomass content of the fuel, the higher the H/C ratio of the resulting tars. These observations also apply to the O/C ratio of the tar. For both switchgrass and pine sawdust, the biomass content of the fuel seems to have no influence on the nitrogen content of the tars. The distribution of sulfur in the tar is inversely proportional to the biomass percentage in the fuel. The higher the biomass content of the fuel, the lower the atomic S/C of the tars.",
author = "Tchapda, {Aime H.} and Vijayaragavan Krishnamoorthy and Yeboah, {Yaw D.} and Pisupati, {Sarma V.}",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaap.2017.09.011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "128",
pages = "379--396",
journal = "Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis",
issn = "0165-2370",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Analysis of tars formed during co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass at high temperature in carbon dioxide atmosphere. / Tchapda, Aime H.; Krishnamoorthy, Vijayaragavan; Yeboah, Yaw D.; Pisupati, Sarma V.

In: Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, Vol. 128, 01.11.2017, p. 379-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of tars formed during co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass at high temperature in carbon dioxide atmosphere

AU - Tchapda, Aime H.

AU - Krishnamoorthy, Vijayaragavan

AU - Yeboah, Yaw D.

AU - Pisupati, Sarma V.

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - The analysis of tars from the high temperature (1573 K–1773 K) co-pyrolysis of coal (Pittsburgh #8) and biomass (Switchgrass and White Pine) in CO2 has been carried out. The analysis shows that naphthalene content is the maximum in all the tar samples irrespective of biomass and coal blend proportion. Samples with high percentages of coal as well as experiments conducted at 1773 K showed the highest concentration of aromatic compounds. The largest aromatic compound found had five benzene rings (benzo(e)pyrene). Aliphatic hydrocarbons as well as oxygenated hydrocarbons were mostly found in samples containing high percentages of biomass or in experiments conducted at 1573 K. About 100 compounds have been identified in the tars of which 25% account for 90% of the mass of tar. The study indicates that the atomic N/C and S/C ratio increases whereas H/C ratio decreases with pyrolysis temperature. The rate of variation of H/C ratio reduces as the temperature increases. The biomass content in the fuel feed seems to have an impact on the H/C ratio of the tars only at lower temperatures. That is, at lower temperatures, the higher the biomass content of the fuel, the higher the H/C ratio of the resulting tars. These observations also apply to the O/C ratio of the tar. For both switchgrass and pine sawdust, the biomass content of the fuel seems to have no influence on the nitrogen content of the tars. The distribution of sulfur in the tar is inversely proportional to the biomass percentage in the fuel. The higher the biomass content of the fuel, the lower the atomic S/C of the tars.

AB - The analysis of tars from the high temperature (1573 K–1773 K) co-pyrolysis of coal (Pittsburgh #8) and biomass (Switchgrass and White Pine) in CO2 has been carried out. The analysis shows that naphthalene content is the maximum in all the tar samples irrespective of biomass and coal blend proportion. Samples with high percentages of coal as well as experiments conducted at 1773 K showed the highest concentration of aromatic compounds. The largest aromatic compound found had five benzene rings (benzo(e)pyrene). Aliphatic hydrocarbons as well as oxygenated hydrocarbons were mostly found in samples containing high percentages of biomass or in experiments conducted at 1573 K. About 100 compounds have been identified in the tars of which 25% account for 90% of the mass of tar. The study indicates that the atomic N/C and S/C ratio increases whereas H/C ratio decreases with pyrolysis temperature. The rate of variation of H/C ratio reduces as the temperature increases. The biomass content in the fuel feed seems to have an impact on the H/C ratio of the tars only at lower temperatures. That is, at lower temperatures, the higher the biomass content of the fuel, the higher the H/C ratio of the resulting tars. These observations also apply to the O/C ratio of the tar. For both switchgrass and pine sawdust, the biomass content of the fuel seems to have no influence on the nitrogen content of the tars. The distribution of sulfur in the tar is inversely proportional to the biomass percentage in the fuel. The higher the biomass content of the fuel, the lower the atomic S/C of the tars.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85031714070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85031714070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaap.2017.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.jaap.2017.09.011

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85031714070

VL - 128

SP - 379

EP - 396

JO - Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis

JF - Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis

SN - 0165-2370

ER -