Analysis of the expressive and receptive language characteristics of emotionally handicapped students served in public school settings

Kathy L. Ruhl, Charles A. Hughes, Stephen M. Camarata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Until the past few years, language characteristics of students receiving services for mild/moderate behavior disorders (BD) have been neglected for research on the language of the more severely disturbed population. However, recent investigations of the language characteristics of mild/moderately BD students have produced sufficient evidence to warrant further study. The purpose of the present study was to examine the language skills (i.e., morphology, syntax, and semantics) of a group of 30 mild/moderately BD students served in public school, resource classrooms. Overall results from the Test of Language Development-Intermediate (TOLD-I) (Hammill & Newcomer, 1982), the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language-Revised (TACL-R) (Carrow-Woolfolk, 1985), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R) (Dunn & Dunn, 1982), and the Expressive One Word Vocabulary Test (EOWVT) (Gardner, 1979) revealed that the BD students fell a minimum of one standard deviation below the normative mean on all but one (i.e., Word Classes and Relations subtest of the TACL-R) of the measures. Further within subject analyses indicated the students were having difficulty with both receptive and expressive language. These findings substantiate the fact that mild/moderate BD students should be considered at risk for language disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-176
Number of pages12
JournalCommunication Disorders Quarterly
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Analysis of the expressive and receptive language characteristics of emotionally handicapped students served in public school settings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this