Analysis of the expressive and receptive language characteristics of emotionally handicapped students served in public school settings

Kathy L. Ruhl, Charles A. Hughes, Stephen M. Camarata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until the past few years, language characteristics of students receiving services for mild/moderate behavior disorders (BD) have been neglected for research on the language of the more severely disturbed population. However, recent investigations of the language characteristics of mild/moderately BD students have produced sufficient evidence to warrant further study. The purpose of the present study was to examine the language skills (i.e., morphology, syntax, and semantics) of a group of 30 mild/moderately BD students served in public school, resource classrooms. Overall results from the Test of Language Development-Intermediate (TOLD-I) (Hammill & Newcomer, 1982), the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language-Revised (TACL-R) (Carrow-Woolfolk, 1985), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R) (Dunn & Dunn, 1982), and the Expressive One Word Vocabulary Test (EOWVT) (Gardner, 1979) revealed that the BD students fell a minimum of one standard deviation below the normative mean on all but one (i.e., Word Classes and Relations subtest of the TACL-R) of the measures. Further within subject analyses indicated the students were having difficulty with both receptive and expressive language. These findings substantiate the fact that mild/moderate BD students should be considered at risk for language disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-176
Number of pages12
JournalCommunication Disorders Quarterly
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

handicapped
Disabled Persons
Language Tests
Mental Disorders
Language
behavior disorder
Students
language
school
student
Language Disorders
Language Development
vocabulary
comprehension
Semantics
syntax
Research
semantics
Population
classroom

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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abstract = "Until the past few years, language characteristics of students receiving services for mild/moderate behavior disorders (BD) have been neglected for research on the language of the more severely disturbed population. However, recent investigations of the language characteristics of mild/moderately BD students have produced sufficient evidence to warrant further study. The purpose of the present study was to examine the language skills (i.e., morphology, syntax, and semantics) of a group of 30 mild/moderately BD students served in public school, resource classrooms. Overall results from the Test of Language Development-Intermediate (TOLD-I) (Hammill & Newcomer, 1982), the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language-Revised (TACL-R) (Carrow-Woolfolk, 1985), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R) (Dunn & Dunn, 1982), and the Expressive One Word Vocabulary Test (EOWVT) (Gardner, 1979) revealed that the BD students fell a minimum of one standard deviation below the normative mean on all but one (i.e., Word Classes and Relations subtest of the TACL-R) of the measures. Further within subject analyses indicated the students were having difficulty with both receptive and expressive language. These findings substantiate the fact that mild/moderate BD students should be considered at risk for language disorders.",
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Analysis of the expressive and receptive language characteristics of emotionally handicapped students served in public school settings. / Ruhl, Kathy L.; Hughes, Charles A.; Camarata, Stephen M.

In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 165-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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