Analysis of the Summer 2004 ozone budget over the United States using Intercontinental Transport Experiment Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS) observations and Model of Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART-4) simulations

G. G. Pfister, L. K. Emmons, P. G. Hess, J. F. Lamarque, Anne Mee Thompson, J. E. Yorks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The origin of ozone over the summertime contiguous United States during summer 2004 was examined using the Intercontinental Transport Experiment (INTEX-A) Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS-04) over North America. We estimate the budget using the global chemistry transport Model of Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) with synthetic tracers that keep track of the ozone produced from selected NOx sources (stratosphere, lightning, anthropogenic, and biomass burning sources in Eurasia and the contiguous United States, and North American boreal fires). This "model budget" is analyzed in conjunction with results from a "laminar identification method" (LID), a more empirical approach to extracting information about contributions from ozone transported down from the stratosphere, advection, and convection. Both methods give comparable results for the contribution from stratospheric ozone, an average over all sites of 20 ± 7% for the LID budget and of 26 ± 6% for the model budget (the standard deviation gives the variability over the IONS sites). These results point toward the important contribution of downward transport of ozone from the stratosphere in assessing tropospheric ozone. The contributions for the other tracers are 25 ± 9% for U.S. sources, 13 ± 5% for Eurasian sources, 3 ± 2% for boreal fires and 10 ± 2% from lightning. In the boundary layer the dominant contribution generally comes from local (U.S.) sources. Eurasian sources can add up to 8% on average for some sites, lightning up to 4%, and North American boreal fires up to 10%. Variations in the tracer contributions across the different sites can be large, but the budget estimated by the model for the entire United States is similar to the budget averaged over the IONS-04 sites which lets us conclude that the sample of locations and launch days conveys a proper representation of the large-scale picture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberD23306
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres
Volume113
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 16 2008

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ozonesondes
ozonesonde
Ozone
ozone
budgets
summer
tracers
tracer techniques
tracer
Upper atmosphere
lightning
Lightning
simulation
stratosphere
Fires
identification method
experiment
Experiments
Stratospheric Ozone
global budgets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

@article{7ef21ade524547fe82afc8228aed3404,
title = "Analysis of the Summer 2004 ozone budget over the United States using Intercontinental Transport Experiment Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS) observations and Model of Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART-4) simulations",
abstract = "The origin of ozone over the summertime contiguous United States during summer 2004 was examined using the Intercontinental Transport Experiment (INTEX-A) Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS-04) over North America. We estimate the budget using the global chemistry transport Model of Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) with synthetic tracers that keep track of the ozone produced from selected NOx sources (stratosphere, lightning, anthropogenic, and biomass burning sources in Eurasia and the contiguous United States, and North American boreal fires). This {"}model budget{"} is analyzed in conjunction with results from a {"}laminar identification method{"} (LID), a more empirical approach to extracting information about contributions from ozone transported down from the stratosphere, advection, and convection. Both methods give comparable results for the contribution from stratospheric ozone, an average over all sites of 20 ± 7{\%} for the LID budget and of 26 ± 6{\%} for the model budget (the standard deviation gives the variability over the IONS sites). These results point toward the important contribution of downward transport of ozone from the stratosphere in assessing tropospheric ozone. The contributions for the other tracers are 25 ± 9{\%} for U.S. sources, 13 ± 5{\%} for Eurasian sources, 3 ± 2{\%} for boreal fires and 10 ± 2{\%} from lightning. In the boundary layer the dominant contribution generally comes from local (U.S.) sources. Eurasian sources can add up to 8{\%} on average for some sites, lightning up to 4{\%}, and North American boreal fires up to 10{\%}. Variations in the tracer contributions across the different sites can be large, but the budget estimated by the model for the entire United States is similar to the budget averaged over the IONS-04 sites which lets us conclude that the sample of locations and launch days conveys a proper representation of the large-scale picture.",
author = "Pfister, {G. G.} and Emmons, {L. K.} and Hess, {P. G.} and Lamarque, {J. F.} and Thompson, {Anne Mee} and Yorks, {J. E.}",
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language = "English (US)",
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Analysis of the Summer 2004 ozone budget over the United States using Intercontinental Transport Experiment Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS) observations and Model of Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART-4) simulations. / Pfister, G. G.; Emmons, L. K.; Hess, P. G.; Lamarque, J. F.; Thompson, Anne Mee; Yorks, J. E.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, Vol. 113, No. 23, D23306, 16.12.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of the Summer 2004 ozone budget over the United States using Intercontinental Transport Experiment Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS) observations and Model of Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART-4) simulations

AU - Pfister, G. G.

AU - Emmons, L. K.

AU - Hess, P. G.

AU - Lamarque, J. F.

AU - Thompson, Anne Mee

AU - Yorks, J. E.

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N2 - The origin of ozone over the summertime contiguous United States during summer 2004 was examined using the Intercontinental Transport Experiment (INTEX-A) Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS-04) over North America. We estimate the budget using the global chemistry transport Model of Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) with synthetic tracers that keep track of the ozone produced from selected NOx sources (stratosphere, lightning, anthropogenic, and biomass burning sources in Eurasia and the contiguous United States, and North American boreal fires). This "model budget" is analyzed in conjunction with results from a "laminar identification method" (LID), a more empirical approach to extracting information about contributions from ozone transported down from the stratosphere, advection, and convection. Both methods give comparable results for the contribution from stratospheric ozone, an average over all sites of 20 ± 7% for the LID budget and of 26 ± 6% for the model budget (the standard deviation gives the variability over the IONS sites). These results point toward the important contribution of downward transport of ozone from the stratosphere in assessing tropospheric ozone. The contributions for the other tracers are 25 ± 9% for U.S. sources, 13 ± 5% for Eurasian sources, 3 ± 2% for boreal fires and 10 ± 2% from lightning. In the boundary layer the dominant contribution generally comes from local (U.S.) sources. Eurasian sources can add up to 8% on average for some sites, lightning up to 4%, and North American boreal fires up to 10%. Variations in the tracer contributions across the different sites can be large, but the budget estimated by the model for the entire United States is similar to the budget averaged over the IONS-04 sites which lets us conclude that the sample of locations and launch days conveys a proper representation of the large-scale picture.

AB - The origin of ozone over the summertime contiguous United States during summer 2004 was examined using the Intercontinental Transport Experiment (INTEX-A) Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS-04) over North America. We estimate the budget using the global chemistry transport Model of Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) with synthetic tracers that keep track of the ozone produced from selected NOx sources (stratosphere, lightning, anthropogenic, and biomass burning sources in Eurasia and the contiguous United States, and North American boreal fires). This "model budget" is analyzed in conjunction with results from a "laminar identification method" (LID), a more empirical approach to extracting information about contributions from ozone transported down from the stratosphere, advection, and convection. Both methods give comparable results for the contribution from stratospheric ozone, an average over all sites of 20 ± 7% for the LID budget and of 26 ± 6% for the model budget (the standard deviation gives the variability over the IONS sites). These results point toward the important contribution of downward transport of ozone from the stratosphere in assessing tropospheric ozone. The contributions for the other tracers are 25 ± 9% for U.S. sources, 13 ± 5% for Eurasian sources, 3 ± 2% for boreal fires and 10 ± 2% from lightning. In the boundary layer the dominant contribution generally comes from local (U.S.) sources. Eurasian sources can add up to 8% on average for some sites, lightning up to 4%, and North American boreal fires up to 10%. Variations in the tracer contributions across the different sites can be large, but the budget estimated by the model for the entire United States is similar to the budget averaged over the IONS-04 sites which lets us conclude that the sample of locations and launch days conveys a proper representation of the large-scale picture.

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