Analysis of WISC-III, Stanford-Binet:IV, and academic achievement test scores in children with autism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonverbal IQs were greater than verbal IQs for young children (3-7 years of age) on the Stanford-Binet:IV (n = 53). However, WISC-III verbal and nonverbal IQs were similar for older children, 6-15 years of age (n = 63). Stanford-Binet:IV profiles were generally consistent for the low-IQ (<80) and high-IQ (≥80) groups, with high scores on visual matching tests (Bead Memory and Quantitative Reasoning). The low- and high-WISC-III IQ groups both performed well relative to IQ on tests of lexical knowledge (Similarities, Information, and Vocabulary), but not on language comprehension and social reasoning (Comprehension). The low-IQ group did best on visuo-motor subtests (Object Assembly and Block Design), but the high-IQ group did not. The high-IQ group had significantly low scores on the Digit Span, Arithmetic, Coding, VMI, and WIAT Written Expression tests, suggesting attention and writing weaknesses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-341
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Vocabulary
Language

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{dbb9e588683f4ca5be2aca966e179861,
title = "Analysis of WISC-III, Stanford-Binet:IV, and academic achievement test scores in children with autism",
abstract = "Nonverbal IQs were greater than verbal IQs for young children (3-7 years of age) on the Stanford-Binet:IV (n = 53). However, WISC-III verbal and nonverbal IQs were similar for older children, 6-15 years of age (n = 63). Stanford-Binet:IV profiles were generally consistent for the low-IQ (<80) and high-IQ (≥80) groups, with high scores on visual matching tests (Bead Memory and Quantitative Reasoning). The low- and high-WISC-III IQ groups both performed well relative to IQ on tests of lexical knowledge (Similarities, Information, and Vocabulary), but not on language comprehension and social reasoning (Comprehension). The low-IQ group did best on visuo-motor subtests (Object Assembly and Block Design), but the high-IQ group did not. The high-IQ group had significantly low scores on the Digit Span, Arithmetic, Coding, VMI, and WIAT Written Expression tests, suggesting attention and writing weaknesses.",
author = "Mayes, {Susan Dickerson} and Calhoun, {Susan L.}",
year = "2003",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1023/A:1024462719081",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "329--341",
journal = "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders",
issn = "0162-3257",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of WISC-III, Stanford-Binet:IV, and academic achievement test scores in children with autism

AU - Mayes, Susan Dickerson

AU - Calhoun, Susan L.

PY - 2003/6/1

Y1 - 2003/6/1

N2 - Nonverbal IQs were greater than verbal IQs for young children (3-7 years of age) on the Stanford-Binet:IV (n = 53). However, WISC-III verbal and nonverbal IQs were similar for older children, 6-15 years of age (n = 63). Stanford-Binet:IV profiles were generally consistent for the low-IQ (<80) and high-IQ (≥80) groups, with high scores on visual matching tests (Bead Memory and Quantitative Reasoning). The low- and high-WISC-III IQ groups both performed well relative to IQ on tests of lexical knowledge (Similarities, Information, and Vocabulary), but not on language comprehension and social reasoning (Comprehension). The low-IQ group did best on visuo-motor subtests (Object Assembly and Block Design), but the high-IQ group did not. The high-IQ group had significantly low scores on the Digit Span, Arithmetic, Coding, VMI, and WIAT Written Expression tests, suggesting attention and writing weaknesses.

AB - Nonverbal IQs were greater than verbal IQs for young children (3-7 years of age) on the Stanford-Binet:IV (n = 53). However, WISC-III verbal and nonverbal IQs were similar for older children, 6-15 years of age (n = 63). Stanford-Binet:IV profiles were generally consistent for the low-IQ (<80) and high-IQ (≥80) groups, with high scores on visual matching tests (Bead Memory and Quantitative Reasoning). The low- and high-WISC-III IQ groups both performed well relative to IQ on tests of lexical knowledge (Similarities, Information, and Vocabulary), but not on language comprehension and social reasoning (Comprehension). The low-IQ group did best on visuo-motor subtests (Object Assembly and Block Design), but the high-IQ group did not. The high-IQ group had significantly low scores on the Digit Span, Arithmetic, Coding, VMI, and WIAT Written Expression tests, suggesting attention and writing weaknesses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0043209005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0043209005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1024462719081

DO - 10.1023/A:1024462719081

M3 - Article

C2 - 12908835

AN - SCOPUS:0043209005

VL - 33

SP - 329

EP - 341

JO - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

JF - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

SN - 0162-3257

IS - 3

ER -