Ancient China and the Yue

Perceptions and identities on the southern frontier, c.400 BCE-50 CE

Research output: Book/ReportBook

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this innovative study, Erica Brindley examines how, during the period 400 BCE–50 CE, Chinese states and an embryonic Chinese empire interacted with peoples referred to as the Yue/Viet along its southern frontier. Brindley provides an overview of current theories in archaeology and linguistics concerning the peoples of the ancient southern frontier of China, the closest relations on the mainland to certain later Southeast Asian and Polynesian peoples. Through analysis of warring states and early Han textual sources, she shows how representations of Chinese and Yue identity invariably fed upon, and often grew out of, a two-way process of centering the self while de-centering the other. Examining rebellions, pivotal ruling figures from various Yue states, and key moments of Yue agency, Brindley demonstrates the complexities involved in identity formation and cultural hybridization in the ancient world and highlights the ancestry of cultures now associated with southern China and Vietnam.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherCambridge University Press
Number of pages279
ISBN (Electronic)9781316026991
ISBN (Print)9781107084780
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Ancient China
Asia
Archaeology
Hybridization
Southeast
Identity Formation
China
Ancestry
Southern China
Viet Nam
Rebellion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

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Ancient China and the Yue : Perceptions and identities on the southern frontier, c.400 BCE-50 CE. / Brindley, Erica Fox.

Cambridge University Press, 2015. 279 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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