Annual rhythms of milk and milk fat and protein production in dairy cattle in the United States

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An annual pattern of milk composition has been well recognized in dairy cattle, with the highest milk fat and protein concentration observed during the winter and lowest occurring in the summer; however, rhythms of milk yield and composition have not been well quantified. Cosinor rhythmometry is commonly used to model repeating daily and annual rhythms and allows determination of the amplitude (peak to mean), acrophase (time at peak), and period (time between peaks) of the rhythm. The objective of this study was to use cosinor rhythmometry to characterize the annual rhythms of milk yield and milk fat and protein concentration and yield using both national milk market and cow-level data. First, 10 yr of monthly average milk butterfat and protein concentration for each Federal Milk Marketing Order were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Marketing Service database. Fat and protein concentration fit a cosine function with a 12-mo period in all milk markets. We noted an interaction between milk marketing order and milk fat and protein concentration. The acrophase (time at peak) of the fat concentration rhythm ranged from December 4 to January 19 in all regions, whereas the rhythm of protein concentration peaked between December 27 and January 6. The amplitude (peak to mean) of the annual rhythm ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 percentage points for milk fat and from 0.08 to 0.12 percentage points for milk protein. The amplitude of the milk fat rhythm generally was lower in southern markets and higher in northern markets. Second, the annual rhythm of milk yield and milk fat and protein yield and concentration were analyzed in monthly test day data from 1,684 cows from 11 tiestall herds in Pennsylvania. Fat and protein concentration fit an annual rhythm in all herds, whereas milk and milk fat and protein yield only fit rhythms in 8 of the 11 herds. On average, milk yield peaked in April, fat and protein yield peaked in February, fat concentration peaked in January, and protein concentration peaked in December. Amplitudes of milk, fat, and protein yield averaged 0.82 kg, 55.3 g, and 30.4 g, respectively. Milk fat and protein concentration had average amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.07, respectively, similar to the results of the milk market data. Generally, milk yield and milk components fit annual rhythm regardless of parity or diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) K232A polymorphism, with only cows of the low-frequency AA genotype (5.2% of total cows) failing to fit rhythm of milk yield. In conclusion, the yearly rhythms of milk yield and fat and protein concentration and yield consistently occur regardless of region, herd, parity, or DGAT1 genotype and supports generation by a conserved endogenous annual rhythm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-753
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of dairy science
Volume102
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Milk Proteins
milk fat
dairy cattle
Milk
Fats
milk
milk yield
proteins
fluid milk
milk marketing orders
milk protein yield
milk fat yield
milk composition
herds
diacylglycerol acyltransferase
lipids
cows
Marketing
Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Cite this

@article{b7203d1bff834390b70016548dd82180,
title = "Annual rhythms of milk and milk fat and protein production in dairy cattle in the United States",
abstract = "An annual pattern of milk composition has been well recognized in dairy cattle, with the highest milk fat and protein concentration observed during the winter and lowest occurring in the summer; however, rhythms of milk yield and composition have not been well quantified. Cosinor rhythmometry is commonly used to model repeating daily and annual rhythms and allows determination of the amplitude (peak to mean), acrophase (time at peak), and period (time between peaks) of the rhythm. The objective of this study was to use cosinor rhythmometry to characterize the annual rhythms of milk yield and milk fat and protein concentration and yield using both national milk market and cow-level data. First, 10 yr of monthly average milk butterfat and protein concentration for each Federal Milk Marketing Order were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Marketing Service database. Fat and protein concentration fit a cosine function with a 12-mo period in all milk markets. We noted an interaction between milk marketing order and milk fat and protein concentration. The acrophase (time at peak) of the fat concentration rhythm ranged from December 4 to January 19 in all regions, whereas the rhythm of protein concentration peaked between December 27 and January 6. The amplitude (peak to mean) of the annual rhythm ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 percentage points for milk fat and from 0.08 to 0.12 percentage points for milk protein. The amplitude of the milk fat rhythm generally was lower in southern markets and higher in northern markets. Second, the annual rhythm of milk yield and milk fat and protein yield and concentration were analyzed in monthly test day data from 1,684 cows from 11 tiestall herds in Pennsylvania. Fat and protein concentration fit an annual rhythm in all herds, whereas milk and milk fat and protein yield only fit rhythms in 8 of the 11 herds. On average, milk yield peaked in April, fat and protein yield peaked in February, fat concentration peaked in January, and protein concentration peaked in December. Amplitudes of milk, fat, and protein yield averaged 0.82 kg, 55.3 g, and 30.4 g, respectively. Milk fat and protein concentration had average amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.07, respectively, similar to the results of the milk market data. Generally, milk yield and milk components fit annual rhythm regardless of parity or diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) K232A polymorphism, with only cows of the low-frequency AA genotype (5.2{\%} of total cows) failing to fit rhythm of milk yield. In conclusion, the yearly rhythms of milk yield and fat and protein concentration and yield consistently occur regardless of region, herd, parity, or DGAT1 genotype and supports generation by a conserved endogenous annual rhythm.",
author = "Salfer, {I. J.} and Dechow, {Chad Daniel} and Harvatine, {Kevin John}",
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Annual rhythms of milk and milk fat and protein production in dairy cattle in the United States. / Salfer, I. J.; Dechow, Chad Daniel; Harvatine, Kevin John.

In: Journal of dairy science, Vol. 102, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 742-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - An annual pattern of milk composition has been well recognized in dairy cattle, with the highest milk fat and protein concentration observed during the winter and lowest occurring in the summer; however, rhythms of milk yield and composition have not been well quantified. Cosinor rhythmometry is commonly used to model repeating daily and annual rhythms and allows determination of the amplitude (peak to mean), acrophase (time at peak), and period (time between peaks) of the rhythm. The objective of this study was to use cosinor rhythmometry to characterize the annual rhythms of milk yield and milk fat and protein concentration and yield using both national milk market and cow-level data. First, 10 yr of monthly average milk butterfat and protein concentration for each Federal Milk Marketing Order were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Marketing Service database. Fat and protein concentration fit a cosine function with a 12-mo period in all milk markets. We noted an interaction between milk marketing order and milk fat and protein concentration. The acrophase (time at peak) of the fat concentration rhythm ranged from December 4 to January 19 in all regions, whereas the rhythm of protein concentration peaked between December 27 and January 6. The amplitude (peak to mean) of the annual rhythm ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 percentage points for milk fat and from 0.08 to 0.12 percentage points for milk protein. The amplitude of the milk fat rhythm generally was lower in southern markets and higher in northern markets. Second, the annual rhythm of milk yield and milk fat and protein yield and concentration were analyzed in monthly test day data from 1,684 cows from 11 tiestall herds in Pennsylvania. Fat and protein concentration fit an annual rhythm in all herds, whereas milk and milk fat and protein yield only fit rhythms in 8 of the 11 herds. On average, milk yield peaked in April, fat and protein yield peaked in February, fat concentration peaked in January, and protein concentration peaked in December. Amplitudes of milk, fat, and protein yield averaged 0.82 kg, 55.3 g, and 30.4 g, respectively. Milk fat and protein concentration had average amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.07, respectively, similar to the results of the milk market data. Generally, milk yield and milk components fit annual rhythm regardless of parity or diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) K232A polymorphism, with only cows of the low-frequency AA genotype (5.2% of total cows) failing to fit rhythm of milk yield. In conclusion, the yearly rhythms of milk yield and fat and protein concentration and yield consistently occur regardless of region, herd, parity, or DGAT1 genotype and supports generation by a conserved endogenous annual rhythm.

AB - An annual pattern of milk composition has been well recognized in dairy cattle, with the highest milk fat and protein concentration observed during the winter and lowest occurring in the summer; however, rhythms of milk yield and composition have not been well quantified. Cosinor rhythmometry is commonly used to model repeating daily and annual rhythms and allows determination of the amplitude (peak to mean), acrophase (time at peak), and period (time between peaks) of the rhythm. The objective of this study was to use cosinor rhythmometry to characterize the annual rhythms of milk yield and milk fat and protein concentration and yield using both national milk market and cow-level data. First, 10 yr of monthly average milk butterfat and protein concentration for each Federal Milk Marketing Order were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Marketing Service database. Fat and protein concentration fit a cosine function with a 12-mo period in all milk markets. We noted an interaction between milk marketing order and milk fat and protein concentration. The acrophase (time at peak) of the fat concentration rhythm ranged from December 4 to January 19 in all regions, whereas the rhythm of protein concentration peaked between December 27 and January 6. The amplitude (peak to mean) of the annual rhythm ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 percentage points for milk fat and from 0.08 to 0.12 percentage points for milk protein. The amplitude of the milk fat rhythm generally was lower in southern markets and higher in northern markets. Second, the annual rhythm of milk yield and milk fat and protein yield and concentration were analyzed in monthly test day data from 1,684 cows from 11 tiestall herds in Pennsylvania. Fat and protein concentration fit an annual rhythm in all herds, whereas milk and milk fat and protein yield only fit rhythms in 8 of the 11 herds. On average, milk yield peaked in April, fat and protein yield peaked in February, fat concentration peaked in January, and protein concentration peaked in December. Amplitudes of milk, fat, and protein yield averaged 0.82 kg, 55.3 g, and 30.4 g, respectively. Milk fat and protein concentration had average amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.07, respectively, similar to the results of the milk market data. Generally, milk yield and milk components fit annual rhythm regardless of parity or diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) K232A polymorphism, with only cows of the low-frequency AA genotype (5.2% of total cows) failing to fit rhythm of milk yield. In conclusion, the yearly rhythms of milk yield and fat and protein concentration and yield consistently occur regardless of region, herd, parity, or DGAT1 genotype and supports generation by a conserved endogenous annual rhythm.

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