Anti-Semitism and Insensitivity Toward Jews by the Counseling Profession: A Gentile's View on the Problem and His Hope for Reconciliation - A Response to Weinrach (2002)

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to suggest solutions to the problems of anti-Semitism and insensitivity toward Jews in the counseling profession, which were discussed by S. G. Weinrach (2002). Specifically, Gentiles are urged to promote healing between Gentile and Jewish counselors by acknowledging that anti-Semitism exists, exploring biases about Jews, learning more about Jewish history and culture, and expressing genuine appreciation for Jewish colleagues. Also, Jewish counselors are invited to assist Gentiles in these efforts by affirming the good will of potential Gentile allies. Other pressing issues the profession must address, such as clarifying the boundaries between professional duties and the expression of personal religious and political convictions, are discussed. Above all else, this article, communicates hope that Jewish and Gentile counselors can achieve a reconciliation that will enhance the counseling profession.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-440
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Counseling and Development
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Jews
Counseling
History
Learning
Counselors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Anti-Semitism and Insensitivity Toward Jews by the Counseling Profession: A Gentile's View on the Problem and His Hope for Reconciliation - A Response to Weinrach (2002)",
abstract = "The purpose of this article is to suggest solutions to the problems of anti-Semitism and insensitivity toward Jews in the counseling profession, which were discussed by S. G. Weinrach (2002). Specifically, Gentiles are urged to promote healing between Gentile and Jewish counselors by acknowledging that anti-Semitism exists, exploring biases about Jews, learning more about Jewish history and culture, and expressing genuine appreciation for Jewish colleagues. Also, Jewish counselors are invited to assist Gentiles in these efforts by affirming the good will of potential Gentile allies. Other pressing issues the profession must address, such as clarifying the boundaries between professional duties and the expression of personal religious and political convictions, are discussed. Above all else, this article, communicates hope that Jewish and Gentile counselors can achieve a reconciliation that will enhance the counseling profession.",
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AB - The purpose of this article is to suggest solutions to the problems of anti-Semitism and insensitivity toward Jews in the counseling profession, which were discussed by S. G. Weinrach (2002). Specifically, Gentiles are urged to promote healing between Gentile and Jewish counselors by acknowledging that anti-Semitism exists, exploring biases about Jews, learning more about Jewish history and culture, and expressing genuine appreciation for Jewish colleagues. Also, Jewish counselors are invited to assist Gentiles in these efforts by affirming the good will of potential Gentile allies. Other pressing issues the profession must address, such as clarifying the boundaries between professional duties and the expression of personal religious and political convictions, are discussed. Above all else, this article, communicates hope that Jewish and Gentile counselors can achieve a reconciliation that will enhance the counseling profession.

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