Antigen inhalation induces mast cells and eosinophils infiltration in the guinea pig esophageal epithelium involving histamine-mediated pathway

Shaoyong Yu, Edward Stahl, Qing Li, Ann Ouyang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antigen challenge in sensitized guinea pig esophagus in vitro induces mast cell degranulation and histamine release. This study tests the hypothesis that antigen inhalation in vivo induces infiltration of the esophageal epithelium by mast cells and eosinophils via a histamine pathway. Actively sensitized guinea pigs were exposed to inhaled 0.1% ovalbumin. One or 24 h after inhalation exposure, the esophagus was processed for immunofluorescent staining of mast cell tryptase and eosinophil major basic protein (MBP). Additional animals were pretreated with thioperamide, a histamine H4/H3 receptor antagonist. Total tryptase- and MBP-labeled cells and percent of positive cells in the epithelial layer were counted. The total number of mast cells was unchanged after inhalation challenge, but the percentage in the epithelium increased 1 h after challenge. The total number of eosinophils increased 1 h after challenge, and the percentage migrating to the epithelium increased by 24 h after challenge. Mast cell migration into the mucosal epithelium preceded that of eosinophils. Thioperamide inhibited mast cell and eosinophil migration. In conclusion, antigen inhalation in sensitized animals induces mast cells and eosinophils to infiltrate in the esophageal epithelium via histamine-mediated mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-330
Number of pages7
JournalLife Sciences
Volume82
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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