Apneic Oxygenation May Not Prevent Severe Hypoxemia During Rapid Sequence Intubation: A Retrospective Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Study

Sattha Riyapan, Jeffrey Lubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective This study sought to determine the effectiveness of apneic oxygenation in preventing hypoxemia during prehospital rapid sequence intubation (RSI). Methods We performed a case-cohort study using a pre-existing database looking at intubation management by a single helicopter emergency medical service between July 2013 and June 2015. Apneic oxygenation using high-flow nasal cannula (15 L/min) was introduced to the standard RSI protocol in July 2014. Severe hypoxemia was defined as an incidence of oxygen saturation less than 90%. We compared patients who received apneic oxygenation during RSI with patients who did not using the Fisher exact test. Results Ninety-three patients were identified from the database; 29 (31.2%) received apneic oxygenation. Nineteen patients had an incidence of severe hypoxemia during RSI (20.43%; 95% confidence interval, 12.77%-30.05%). There was no statistically significant difference between the rate of severe hypoxemia between patients in the apneic oxygenation group versus the control group (17.2% vs. 21.9%, P =.78). Conclusion In this study, patients who received apneic oxygenation did not show a statistically significant difference in severe hypoxemia during RSI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-368
Number of pages4
JournalAir Medical Journal
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency

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