ApoE genome does not predict lipid response to changes in dietary saturated fatty acids in a heterogeneous normolipidemic population

Michael Lefevre, Henry N. Ginsberg, Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton, Patricia J. Elmer, Paul W. Stewart, Abby Ershow, Thomas A. Pearson, Paul S. Roheim, Rajasekhar Ramakrishnan, Janice Derr, David J. Gordon, Roberta Reed

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Abstract

Recent studies have suggested that variations in apoE genotypes may influence the magnitude of plasma lipid changes in response to dietary interventions. We examined the ability of apoE genotype to predict plasma lipid response to reductions in percent of calories from total fat (TF) and saturated fat (SF) in a normolipidemic study population (n=103) heterogeneous with respect to age, gender, race, and menopausal status. Three diets, an average American diet (34.3% TF, 15.0% SF), an AHA Step 1 diet (28.6% TF, 9.0% SF), and a low saturated fat (Low-Sat) diet (25.3% TF, 6.1% SF) were each fed for a period of 8 weeks in a three-way crossover design. Cholesterol was kept constant at 275 mg/d; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat were kept constant at approximately 13% and 6.5% of calories, respectively. Fasting lipid levels were measured during each of the final 4 weeks of each diet period. Participants were grouped by apoE genotype: E2 (E2/2, E2/3, E2/4); E3 (E3/3); E4 (E3/4, E4/4). Relative to the average American diet, both the Step 1 and Low-Sat diets significantly reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol in all three apoE genotype groups. No evidence of a significant diet by genotype interaction, however, could be identified for any of the measured lipid and lipoprotein end points. Additional analysis of the data within individual population subgroups (men and women, blacks and whites) likewise provided no evidence of a significant diet by genotype interaction. Thus, in a heterogeneous, normolipidemic study population, apoE genotype does not predict the magnitude of lipid response to reductions in dietary saturated fat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2914-2923
Number of pages10
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Apolipoproteins E
Fatty Acids
Fats
Genome
Lipids
Genotype
Diet
Population
Fat-Restricted Diet
Cholesterol
Aptitude
Dietary Fats
LDL Cholesterol
Cross-Over Studies
HDL Cholesterol
Lipoproteins
Fasting

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Lefevre, Michael ; Ginsberg, Henry N. ; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret ; Elmer, Patricia J. ; Stewart, Paul W. ; Ershow, Abby ; Pearson, Thomas A. ; Roheim, Paul S. ; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar ; Derr, Janice ; Gordon, David J. ; Reed, Roberta. / ApoE genome does not predict lipid response to changes in dietary saturated fatty acids in a heterogeneous normolipidemic population. In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. 1997 ; Vol. 17, No. 11. pp. 2914-2923.
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abstract = "Recent studies have suggested that variations in apoE genotypes may influence the magnitude of plasma lipid changes in response to dietary interventions. We examined the ability of apoE genotype to predict plasma lipid response to reductions in percent of calories from total fat (TF) and saturated fat (SF) in a normolipidemic study population (n=103) heterogeneous with respect to age, gender, race, and menopausal status. Three diets, an average American diet (34.3{\%} TF, 15.0{\%} SF), an AHA Step 1 diet (28.6{\%} TF, 9.0{\%} SF), and a low saturated fat (Low-Sat) diet (25.3{\%} TF, 6.1{\%} SF) were each fed for a period of 8 weeks in a three-way crossover design. Cholesterol was kept constant at 275 mg/d; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat were kept constant at approximately 13{\%} and 6.5{\%} of calories, respectively. Fasting lipid levels were measured during each of the final 4 weeks of each diet period. Participants were grouped by apoE genotype: E2 (E2/2, E2/3, E2/4); E3 (E3/3); E4 (E3/4, E4/4). Relative to the average American diet, both the Step 1 and Low-Sat diets significantly reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol in all three apoE genotype groups. No evidence of a significant diet by genotype interaction, however, could be identified for any of the measured lipid and lipoprotein end points. Additional analysis of the data within individual population subgroups (men and women, blacks and whites) likewise provided no evidence of a significant diet by genotype interaction. Thus, in a heterogeneous, normolipidemic study population, apoE genotype does not predict the magnitude of lipid response to reductions in dietary saturated fat.",
author = "Michael Lefevre and Ginsberg, {Henry N.} and Kris-Etherton, {Penny Margaret} and Elmer, {Patricia J.} and Stewart, {Paul W.} and Abby Ershow and Pearson, {Thomas A.} and Roheim, {Paul S.} and Rajasekhar Ramakrishnan and Janice Derr and Gordon, {David J.} and Roberta Reed",
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Lefevre, M, Ginsberg, HN, Kris-Etherton, PM, Elmer, PJ, Stewart, PW, Ershow, A, Pearson, TA, Roheim, PS, Ramakrishnan, R, Derr, J, Gordon, DJ & Reed, R 1997, 'ApoE genome does not predict lipid response to changes in dietary saturated fatty acids in a heterogeneous normolipidemic population', Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 17, no. 11, pp. 2914-2923. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.ATV.17.11.2914

ApoE genome does not predict lipid response to changes in dietary saturated fatty acids in a heterogeneous normolipidemic population. / Lefevre, Michael; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret; Elmer, Patricia J.; Stewart, Paul W.; Ershow, Abby; Pearson, Thomas A.; Roheim, Paul S.; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Derr, Janice; Gordon, David J.; Reed, Roberta.

In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, Vol. 17, No. 11, 01.01.1997, p. 2914-2923.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lefevre, Michael

AU - Ginsberg, Henry N.

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AU - Elmer, Patricia J.

AU - Stewart, Paul W.

AU - Ershow, Abby

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AU - Roheim, Paul S.

AU - Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar

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AU - Gordon, David J.

AU - Reed, Roberta

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