Appendectomy in the surgical management of women with endometriosis and pelvic pain

Whitney Trotter Ross, Amanda Chu, Linda Li, Allen R. Kunselman, Gerald Harkins, Timothy Deimling, Andrea S. Benton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the role of appendectomy in surgical excision of endometriosis and to assess complications associated with appendectomy. Methods: Retrospective study of women undergoing appendectomy for pelvic pain and/or endometriosis during a primary gynecologic procedure. Results: Record review was performed for 609 women who underwent appendectomy between 2013 and 2019 for pelvic pain (6.9%, 42/609), stage I–II endometriosis (63.7%, 388/609), or stage III–IV endometriosis (29.4%, 179/609). Appendiceal endometriosis (AppE) was present in 14.9% (91/609); 2.4% without endometriosis (1/42, reference group), 7.0% with stage I–II endometriosis (27/388, odds ratio [OR] 3.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41–23.11, P = 0.278), and 35.2% with stage III–IV endometriosis (63/179, OR 22.24, 95% CI 2.99–165.40, P = 0.002). AppE was significantly associated with endometriosis present in other locations (OR 5.27, 95% CI 2.66–10.43, P < 0.001). The predicted probability of identifying AppE ranged from 6% with 0 positive endometriosis sites to 56% when 4 or more sites were identified. There were no complications related to the performance of an appendectomy. Conclusion: Women with chronic pelvic pain and/or endometriosis have an increased risk of AppE. Modern appendectomy at the time of gynecologic surgery is safe, with no associated complications in this study. Our findings support the consideration of appendectomy as part of the comprehensive surgical management of endometriosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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