Application of a single-instruction computer to dilation and erosion of gray-valued images

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, the single instruction architecture is used to construct circuitry to perform dilation and erosion of gray valued images, where the gray values are discrete but limited only by the number of bits chosen for the binary encoding. In addition, methods for minimizing the number of cells needed, using basic digital techniques, are discussed. While others have constructed architectures for gray valued dilation and erosion, these are based on non- homogeneous circuits, and typically use Umbra transformations to handle the gray values, rather than binary encoding. Finally, it is shown that the half-adder elements used in the single instruction architecture can easily be replaced with uniform multiplexer cells in deference to the McCulloch-Pitts model of the neuron. This analogy between the single instruction architecture and the neuronal construction of the brain is intentional.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages209-214
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)0819410276
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
EventIntelligent Robots and Computer Vision XI: Biological, Neural Net, and 3-D Methods - Boston, MA, USA
Duration: Nov 18 1992Nov 20 1992

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume1826
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherIntelligent Robots and Computer Vision XI: Biological, Neural Net, and 3-D Methods
CityBoston, MA, USA
Period11/18/9211/20/92

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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