Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component

Sai Nithin Reddy, Vincent Maranan, Timothy William Simpson, Todd Palmer, Corey J. Dickman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Topology optimization is a well-established engineering practice to optimize the design and layout of parts to create lightweight and low-cost structures, which have historically been difficult, or impossible, to make. Additive Manufacturing (AM) provides the freedom to fabricate the complex and organic shapes that topology optimization often generates. In this paper we use topology optimization to create lightweight designs while conforming to additive manufacturing constraints related to overhanging features and unsupported surfaces when using metallic materials. More specifically, we use design for additive manufacturing (DfAM) rules along with topology optimization to study the tradeoffs between the weight of the part, support requirements, manufacturing costs, and performance. The case study entails redesigning an upright on the SAE Formula student racecar to reduce support structures and manufacturing and material cost when using Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS). Manufacturing the optimized design without applying DfAM rules required support material up to 202.4% of the volume of the model. Using DfAM, the upright is redesigned and manufactured with supports requiring less than 15% of the volume of the model. The results demonstrate the challenges in achieving a balance between weight reduction, manufacturing costs, and factor of safety of the design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication42nd Design Automation Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791850107
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
EventASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016 - Charlotte, United States
Duration: Aug 21 2016Aug 24 2016

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume2A-2016

Other

OtherASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016
CountryUnited States
CityCharlotte
Period8/21/168/24/16

Fingerprint

3D printers
Topology Optimization
Shape optimization
Manufacturing
Costs
Design
Sintering
Shape Optimization
Students
Layout
Safety
Metals
Trade-offs
Lasers
Optimise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Reddy, S. N., Maranan, V., Simpson, T. W., Palmer, T., & Dickman, C. J. (2016). Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component. In 42nd Design Automation Conference (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 2A-2016). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-59719
Reddy, Sai Nithin ; Maranan, Vincent ; Simpson, Timothy William ; Palmer, Todd ; Dickman, Corey J. / Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component. 42nd Design Automation Conference. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2016. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
@inproceedings{68f772ae33c8478c8ad9cbf3ea5015ac,
title = "Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component",
abstract = "Topology optimization is a well-established engineering practice to optimize the design and layout of parts to create lightweight and low-cost structures, which have historically been difficult, or impossible, to make. Additive Manufacturing (AM) provides the freedom to fabricate the complex and organic shapes that topology optimization often generates. In this paper we use topology optimization to create lightweight designs while conforming to additive manufacturing constraints related to overhanging features and unsupported surfaces when using metallic materials. More specifically, we use design for additive manufacturing (DfAM) rules along with topology optimization to study the tradeoffs between the weight of the part, support requirements, manufacturing costs, and performance. The case study entails redesigning an upright on the SAE Formula student racecar to reduce support structures and manufacturing and material cost when using Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS). Manufacturing the optimized design without applying DfAM rules required support material up to 202.4{\%} of the volume of the model. Using DfAM, the upright is redesigned and manufactured with supports requiring less than 15{\%} of the volume of the model. The results demonstrate the challenges in achieving a balance between weight reduction, manufacturing costs, and factor of safety of the design.",
author = "Reddy, {Sai Nithin} and Vincent Maranan and Simpson, {Timothy William} and Todd Palmer and Dickman, {Corey J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1115/DETC2016-59719",
language = "English (US)",
series = "Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)",
booktitle = "42nd Design Automation Conference",

}

Reddy, SN, Maranan, V, Simpson, TW, Palmer, T & Dickman, CJ 2016, Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component. in 42nd Design Automation Conference. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 2A-2016, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016, Charlotte, United States, 8/21/16. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-59719

Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component. / Reddy, Sai Nithin; Maranan, Vincent; Simpson, Timothy William; Palmer, Todd; Dickman, Corey J.

42nd Design Automation Conference. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2016. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 2A-2016).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component

AU - Reddy, Sai Nithin

AU - Maranan, Vincent

AU - Simpson, Timothy William

AU - Palmer, Todd

AU - Dickman, Corey J.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Topology optimization is a well-established engineering practice to optimize the design and layout of parts to create lightweight and low-cost structures, which have historically been difficult, or impossible, to make. Additive Manufacturing (AM) provides the freedom to fabricate the complex and organic shapes that topology optimization often generates. In this paper we use topology optimization to create lightweight designs while conforming to additive manufacturing constraints related to overhanging features and unsupported surfaces when using metallic materials. More specifically, we use design for additive manufacturing (DfAM) rules along with topology optimization to study the tradeoffs between the weight of the part, support requirements, manufacturing costs, and performance. The case study entails redesigning an upright on the SAE Formula student racecar to reduce support structures and manufacturing and material cost when using Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS). Manufacturing the optimized design without applying DfAM rules required support material up to 202.4% of the volume of the model. Using DfAM, the upright is redesigned and manufactured with supports requiring less than 15% of the volume of the model. The results demonstrate the challenges in achieving a balance between weight reduction, manufacturing costs, and factor of safety of the design.

AB - Topology optimization is a well-established engineering practice to optimize the design and layout of parts to create lightweight and low-cost structures, which have historically been difficult, or impossible, to make. Additive Manufacturing (AM) provides the freedom to fabricate the complex and organic shapes that topology optimization often generates. In this paper we use topology optimization to create lightweight designs while conforming to additive manufacturing constraints related to overhanging features and unsupported surfaces when using metallic materials. More specifically, we use design for additive manufacturing (DfAM) rules along with topology optimization to study the tradeoffs between the weight of the part, support requirements, manufacturing costs, and performance. The case study entails redesigning an upright on the SAE Formula student racecar to reduce support structures and manufacturing and material cost when using Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS). Manufacturing the optimized design without applying DfAM rules required support material up to 202.4% of the volume of the model. Using DfAM, the upright is redesigned and manufactured with supports requiring less than 15% of the volume of the model. The results demonstrate the challenges in achieving a balance between weight reduction, manufacturing costs, and factor of safety of the design.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008155461&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008155461&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/DETC2016-59719

DO - 10.1115/DETC2016-59719

M3 - Conference contribution

T3 - Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference

BT - 42nd Design Automation Conference

PB - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

ER -

Reddy SN, Maranan V, Simpson TW, Palmer T, Dickman CJ. Application of topology optimization and design for additive manufacturing guidelines on an automotive component. In 42nd Design Automation Conference. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2016. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-59719