Applying Hierarchical Linear Modeling to Extended Longitudinal Evaluations

The Boys Town Follow-Up Study

D. Wayne Osgood, Gail L. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Longitudinal research designs with many waves of data have the potential to provide a fine-grained description of program impact, so they should be of special value for evaluation research. This potential has been illusive because our principal analysis methods are poorly suited to the task. We present strategies for analyzing these designs using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). The basic growth curve models found in most longitudinal applications of HLM are not well suited to program evaluation, so we develop more appropriate alternatives. Our approach defines well-focused parameters that yield meaningful effect-size estimates and significance tests, efficiently combining all waves of data available for each subject. These methods do not require a uniform set of observations from all respondents. The Boys Town Follow-Up Study, an exceptionally rich but complex data set, is used to illustrate our approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-38
Number of pages36
JournalEvaluation Review
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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town
evaluation
significance test
evaluation research
research planning
Evaluation
Boys
Waves
Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Values
Research Design
Longitudinal Research
Research Evaluation
Program Evaluation
Effect Size
Growth Curve

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Applying Hierarchical Linear Modeling to Extended Longitudinal Evaluations : The Boys Town Follow-Up Study. / Osgood, D. Wayne; Smith, Gail L.

In: Evaluation Review, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 3-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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