Applying the electrode potential slope method as a tool to quantitatively evaluate the performance of individual microbial electrolysis cell components

Benjamin P. Cario, Ruggero Rossi, Kyoung Yeol Kim, Bruce Ernest Logan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Improving the design of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)requires better identification of the specific factors that limit performance. The contributions of the electrodes, solution, and membrane to internal resistance were quantified here using the newly-developed electrode potential slope (EPS)method. The largest portion of total internal resistance (120 ± 0 mΩ m2)was associated with the carbon felt anode (71 ± 5 mΩ m2, 59% of total), likely due to substrate and ion mass transfer limitations arising from stagnant fluid conditions and placement of the electrode against the anion exchange membrane. The anode resistance was followed by the solution (25 mΩ m2)and cathode (18 ± 2 mΩ m2)resistances, and a negligible membrane resistance. Wide adoption and application of the EPS method will enable direct comparison between the performance of the components of MECs with different solution characteristics, electrode size and spacing, reactor architecture, and operating conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number121418
JournalBioresource technology
Volume287
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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Regenerative fuel cells
electrokinesis
electrode
Electrodes
membrane
Membranes
Anodes
Anions
mass transfer
ion exchange
Ion exchange
spacing
Cathodes
Negative ions
Mass transfer
method
Ions
substrate
Carbon
Fluids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

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Applying the electrode potential slope method as a tool to quantitatively evaluate the performance of individual microbial electrolysis cell components. / Cario, Benjamin P.; Rossi, Ruggero; Kim, Kyoung Yeol; Logan, Bruce Ernest.

In: Bioresource technology, Vol. 287, 121418, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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