Approach-avoidance movement influences the decoding of anger and fear expressions

Anthony J. Nelson, Reginald B. Adams, Michael T. Stevenson, Max Weisbuch, Michael I. Norton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two studies, the authors examined whether apparent motion of a face (either toward or away from an observer) influences the recognition of facial displays of anger and fear. Based on theories regarding the signal value of specific threat displays (i.e., shared signal hypothesis), the authors predicted that anger (an approach-oriented threat display) would be more readily recognized in faces that appear to be approaching the observer, whereas fear (an avoidance-oriented threat display) would be more readily recognized in faces that appear to be withdrawing. Consistent with these predictions, the authors found that angry faces were recognized more accurately when approaching versus withdrawing, and vice versa for fearful faces. This occurred not only for faces that were made to appear moving by changing the size of the stimulus (Study 1), but also for faces that were presented after a visual illusion that gave the perception that the faces were approaching or withdrawing (Study 2). These findings suggest that the ability to recognize threat from facial expressions is influenced by apparent motion in an ecologically relevant manner, matching the underlying action tendency (fight/flight) associated with each emotion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)745-757
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Cognition
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 19 2013

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Anger
Fear
Facial Expression
Aptitude
Emotions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Nelson, Anthony J. ; Adams, Reginald B. ; Stevenson, Michael T. ; Weisbuch, Max ; Norton, Michael I. / Approach-avoidance movement influences the decoding of anger and fear expressions. In: Social Cognition. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 745-757.
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Approach-avoidance movement influences the decoding of anger and fear expressions. / Nelson, Anthony J.; Adams, Reginald B.; Stevenson, Michael T.; Weisbuch, Max; Norton, Michael I.

In: Social Cognition, Vol. 31, No. 6, 19.12.2013, p. 745-757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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