Appropriate personal protective equipment: Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements

F. Richard Beard, Michael Pate, Kelsey Hall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) have in the past and continue to be the standard safety references for chemical products. Revised MSDS documents are now referred to as Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and these references include numerous safety requirements such as personal protective equipment (PPE) that are also listed on the corresponding pesticide labels. In some instances the requirements on the SDS (MSDS) references have a different protective requirements listed for PPE than what appears on the pesticide label for identical products. This presents some confusion for applicators and handlers when determining which set of requirements offers the appropriate level of personal protection for pesticide applicators and handlers. This is of particular importance when PPE list include respirators and the two references have differ in requirements. Previous research suggests that safety warnings must be understood by the intended target audience to be effective. The inconsistencies between pesticide labels and SDS documents could increase risks to applicators and handlers. This inconsistency is further complicated by the changes proposed for the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). Under the proposed WPS changes, OSHA standards which are reflected on SDS documents, must be adopted for respirator requirements. Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), SDS (MSDS) requirements that conflict with the FIFRA approved pesticide label requirements will be problematic. To provide clarification and compliance guidance, the EPA has recommended that pesticide registrants insert FIFRA label information and a brief explanation of any differences on the corresponding SDS. For their health and safety, it is critical for pesticide applicators and handlers to understand pesticide personal protective information. The reading, comprehension, and compliance with of pesticide labels has in the past been problematic for agricultural producers and workers and this will be further complicated by the proposed WPS requirements. Data are reported on training activities supported by a NIOSH agricultural safety and health center pilot project funding. Continued education and training is needed to assure that people exposed to pesticides use appropriate PPE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014
PublisherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Pages2948-2955
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781632668455
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: Jul 13 2014Jul 16 2014

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014
Volume4

Other

OtherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period7/13/147/16/14

Fingerprint

Pesticides
Labels
pesticides
Material Safety Data Sheets
Safety
rodenticides
Rodenticides
pest control operators
Applicators
fungicides
Insecticides
insecticides
Fungicides
compliance
Mechanical Ventilators
Respirators
agricultural health and safety
product labeling
safety standards
Chemical Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Beard, F. R., Pate, M., & Hall, K. (2014). Appropriate personal protective equipment: Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014 (pp. 2948-2955). (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014; Vol. 4). American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.
Beard, F. Richard ; Pate, Michael ; Hall, Kelsey. / Appropriate personal protective equipment : Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2014. pp. 2948-2955 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014).
@inproceedings{7cbcd280c76c435185fcdba1c0be7814,
title = "Appropriate personal protective equipment: Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements",
abstract = "The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) have in the past and continue to be the standard safety references for chemical products. Revised MSDS documents are now referred to as Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and these references include numerous safety requirements such as personal protective equipment (PPE) that are also listed on the corresponding pesticide labels. In some instances the requirements on the SDS (MSDS) references have a different protective requirements listed for PPE than what appears on the pesticide label for identical products. This presents some confusion for applicators and handlers when determining which set of requirements offers the appropriate level of personal protection for pesticide applicators and handlers. This is of particular importance when PPE list include respirators and the two references have differ in requirements. Previous research suggests that safety warnings must be understood by the intended target audience to be effective. The inconsistencies between pesticide labels and SDS documents could increase risks to applicators and handlers. This inconsistency is further complicated by the changes proposed for the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). Under the proposed WPS changes, OSHA standards which are reflected on SDS documents, must be adopted for respirator requirements. Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), SDS (MSDS) requirements that conflict with the FIFRA approved pesticide label requirements will be problematic. To provide clarification and compliance guidance, the EPA has recommended that pesticide registrants insert FIFRA label information and a brief explanation of any differences on the corresponding SDS. For their health and safety, it is critical for pesticide applicators and handlers to understand pesticide personal protective information. The reading, comprehension, and compliance with of pesticide labels has in the past been problematic for agricultural producers and workers and this will be further complicated by the proposed WPS requirements. Data are reported on training activities supported by a NIOSH agricultural safety and health center pilot project funding. Continued education and training is needed to assure that people exposed to pesticides use appropriate PPE.",
author = "Beard, {F. Richard} and Michael Pate and Kelsey Hall",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
series = "American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014",
publisher = "American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers",
pages = "2948--2955",
booktitle = "American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014",
address = "United States",

}

Beard, FR, Pate, M & Hall, K 2014, Appropriate personal protective equipment: Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements. in American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014, vol. 4, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, pp. 2948-2955, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014, Montreal, Canada, 7/13/14.

Appropriate personal protective equipment : Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements. / Beard, F. Richard; Pate, Michael; Hall, Kelsey.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2014. p. 2948-2955 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014; Vol. 4).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Appropriate personal protective equipment

T2 - Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements

AU - Beard, F. Richard

AU - Pate, Michael

AU - Hall, Kelsey

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) have in the past and continue to be the standard safety references for chemical products. Revised MSDS documents are now referred to as Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and these references include numerous safety requirements such as personal protective equipment (PPE) that are also listed on the corresponding pesticide labels. In some instances the requirements on the SDS (MSDS) references have a different protective requirements listed for PPE than what appears on the pesticide label for identical products. This presents some confusion for applicators and handlers when determining which set of requirements offers the appropriate level of personal protection for pesticide applicators and handlers. This is of particular importance when PPE list include respirators and the two references have differ in requirements. Previous research suggests that safety warnings must be understood by the intended target audience to be effective. The inconsistencies between pesticide labels and SDS documents could increase risks to applicators and handlers. This inconsistency is further complicated by the changes proposed for the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). Under the proposed WPS changes, OSHA standards which are reflected on SDS documents, must be adopted for respirator requirements. Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), SDS (MSDS) requirements that conflict with the FIFRA approved pesticide label requirements will be problematic. To provide clarification and compliance guidance, the EPA has recommended that pesticide registrants insert FIFRA label information and a brief explanation of any differences on the corresponding SDS. For their health and safety, it is critical for pesticide applicators and handlers to understand pesticide personal protective information. The reading, comprehension, and compliance with of pesticide labels has in the past been problematic for agricultural producers and workers and this will be further complicated by the proposed WPS requirements. Data are reported on training activities supported by a NIOSH agricultural safety and health center pilot project funding. Continued education and training is needed to assure that people exposed to pesticides use appropriate PPE.

AB - The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) have in the past and continue to be the standard safety references for chemical products. Revised MSDS documents are now referred to as Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and these references include numerous safety requirements such as personal protective equipment (PPE) that are also listed on the corresponding pesticide labels. In some instances the requirements on the SDS (MSDS) references have a different protective requirements listed for PPE than what appears on the pesticide label for identical products. This presents some confusion for applicators and handlers when determining which set of requirements offers the appropriate level of personal protection for pesticide applicators and handlers. This is of particular importance when PPE list include respirators and the two references have differ in requirements. Previous research suggests that safety warnings must be understood by the intended target audience to be effective. The inconsistencies between pesticide labels and SDS documents could increase risks to applicators and handlers. This inconsistency is further complicated by the changes proposed for the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). Under the proposed WPS changes, OSHA standards which are reflected on SDS documents, must be adopted for respirator requirements. Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), SDS (MSDS) requirements that conflict with the FIFRA approved pesticide label requirements will be problematic. To provide clarification and compliance guidance, the EPA has recommended that pesticide registrants insert FIFRA label information and a brief explanation of any differences on the corresponding SDS. For their health and safety, it is critical for pesticide applicators and handlers to understand pesticide personal protective information. The reading, comprehension, and compliance with of pesticide labels has in the past been problematic for agricultural producers and workers and this will be further complicated by the proposed WPS requirements. Data are reported on training activities supported by a NIOSH agricultural safety and health center pilot project funding. Continued education and training is needed to assure that people exposed to pesticides use appropriate PPE.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84911427232&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84911427232&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84911427232

T3 - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014

SP - 2948

EP - 2955

BT - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014

PB - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

ER -

Beard FR, Pate M, Hall K. Appropriate personal protective equipment: Pesticide label requirements or safety data sheet requirements. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 2014. p. 2948-2955. (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2014, ASABE 2014).