Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty

Douglas James Kennett, Stephen Plog, Richard J. George, Brendan James Culleton, Adam S. Watson, Pontus Skoglund, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Kristin Stewardson, Logan Kistler, Steven A. Leblanc, Peter M. Whiteley, David Reich, George H. Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For societies with writing systems, hereditary leadership is documented as one of the hallmarks of early political complexity and governance. In contrast, it is unknown whether hereditary succession played a role in the early formation of prehistoric complex societies that lacked writing. Here we use an archaeogenomic approach to identify an elite matriline that persisted between 800 and 1130 CE in Chaco Canyon, the centre of an expansive prehistoric complex society in the Southwestern United States. We show that nine individuals buried in an elite crypt at Pueblo Bonito, the largest structure in the canyon, have identical mitochondrial genomes. Analyses of nuclear genome data from six samples with the highest DNA preservation demonstrate mother-daughter and grandmother-grandson relationships, evidence for a multigenerational matrilineal descent group. Together, these results demonstrate the persistence of an elite matriline in Chaco for 1/4330 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number14115
JournalNature communications
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 21 2017

Fingerprint

canyons
genome
Genes
leadership
descent
Southwestern United States
Mitochondrial Genome
deoxyribonucleic acid
Nuclear Family
DNA
Mothers
Genome

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Kennett, Douglas James ; Plog, Stephen ; George, Richard J. ; Culleton, Brendan James ; Watson, Adam S. ; Skoglund, Pontus ; Rohland, Nadin ; Mallick, Swapan ; Stewardson, Kristin ; Kistler, Logan ; Leblanc, Steven A. ; Whiteley, Peter M. ; Reich, David ; Perry, George H. / Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty. In: Nature communications. 2017 ; Vol. 8.
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Kennett, DJ, Plog, S, George, RJ, Culleton, BJ, Watson, AS, Skoglund, P, Rohland, N, Mallick, S, Stewardson, K, Kistler, L, Leblanc, SA, Whiteley, PM, Reich, D & Perry, GH 2017, 'Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty', Nature communications, vol. 8, 14115. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14115

Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty. / Kennett, Douglas James; Plog, Stephen; George, Richard J.; Culleton, Brendan James; Watson, Adam S.; Skoglund, Pontus; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Stewardson, Kristin; Kistler, Logan; Leblanc, Steven A.; Whiteley, Peter M.; Reich, David; Perry, George H.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 8, 14115, 21.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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