Are Co-users of Alcohol and Marijuana More Willing to Experience Consequences From Drinking? A Longitudinal Examination Among First-Year College Students

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Abstract

Background: Alcohol and marijuana co-users are at heightened vulnerability for experiencing a variety of negative alcohol use outcomes including heavier alcohol use and driving under the influence. The current study explored willingness to experience negative consequences as a potential factor underlying the association between co-user status and negative consequences in an effort to guide future intervention work. From a longitudinal study of first-year college students, we examined willingness to experience consequences at Time 2 as a mediator of co-user status at Time 1 and experience of negative consequences at Time 3. Methods: First-year college student drinkers (n = 1,914) at a large university completed surveys in the fall and spring of their freshman year and the fall of their sophomore year. Results: Alcohol and marijuana co-users reported higher willingness to experience consequences than alcohol-only users. Willingness to experience consequences partially explained the association between alcohol and marijuana couse and consequences. Conclusions: The current study was the first to compare co-users of alcohol and marijuana to alcohol-only users on willingness to experience consequences, and examine the role of willingness as a mediator between co-user status and consequences experienced. Co-users were more willing to experience adverse effects from drinking, in turn predicting more consequences. Intervention work targeting consequences may be less effective for co-users; thus, additional work is needed to identify other potential mechanisms for change for this at-risk group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1567-1574
Number of pages8
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Cannabis
Drinking
Alcohols
Students
Longitudinal Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{c39d5d2838f24968a6faca6028e88a6b,
title = "Are Co-users of Alcohol and Marijuana More Willing to Experience Consequences From Drinking? A Longitudinal Examination Among First-Year College Students",
abstract = "Background: Alcohol and marijuana co-users are at heightened vulnerability for experiencing a variety of negative alcohol use outcomes including heavier alcohol use and driving under the influence. The current study explored willingness to experience negative consequences as a potential factor underlying the association between co-user status and negative consequences in an effort to guide future intervention work. From a longitudinal study of first-year college students, we examined willingness to experience consequences at Time 2 as a mediator of co-user status at Time 1 and experience of negative consequences at Time 3. Methods: First-year college student drinkers (n = 1,914) at a large university completed surveys in the fall and spring of their freshman year and the fall of their sophomore year. Results: Alcohol and marijuana co-users reported higher willingness to experience consequences than alcohol-only users. Willingness to experience consequences partially explained the association between alcohol and marijuana couse and consequences. Conclusions: The current study was the first to compare co-users of alcohol and marijuana to alcohol-only users on willingness to experience consequences, and examine the role of willingness as a mediator between co-user status and consequences experienced. Co-users were more willing to experience adverse effects from drinking, in turn predicting more consequences. Intervention work targeting consequences may be less effective for co-users; thus, additional work is needed to identify other potential mechanisms for change for this at-risk group.",
author = "Carmichael, {Ashley Nicole} and Mallett, {Kimberly Anne} and Nichole Sell and Turrisi, {Robert J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/acer.14075",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "1567--1574",
journal = "Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research",
issn = "0145-6008",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

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T1 - Are Co-users of Alcohol and Marijuana More Willing to Experience Consequences From Drinking? A Longitudinal Examination Among First-Year College Students

AU - Carmichael, Ashley Nicole

AU - Mallett, Kimberly Anne

AU - Sell, Nichole

AU - Turrisi, Robert J.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Background: Alcohol and marijuana co-users are at heightened vulnerability for experiencing a variety of negative alcohol use outcomes including heavier alcohol use and driving under the influence. The current study explored willingness to experience negative consequences as a potential factor underlying the association between co-user status and negative consequences in an effort to guide future intervention work. From a longitudinal study of first-year college students, we examined willingness to experience consequences at Time 2 as a mediator of co-user status at Time 1 and experience of negative consequences at Time 3. Methods: First-year college student drinkers (n = 1,914) at a large university completed surveys in the fall and spring of their freshman year and the fall of their sophomore year. Results: Alcohol and marijuana co-users reported higher willingness to experience consequences than alcohol-only users. Willingness to experience consequences partially explained the association between alcohol and marijuana couse and consequences. Conclusions: The current study was the first to compare co-users of alcohol and marijuana to alcohol-only users on willingness to experience consequences, and examine the role of willingness as a mediator between co-user status and consequences experienced. Co-users were more willing to experience adverse effects from drinking, in turn predicting more consequences. Intervention work targeting consequences may be less effective for co-users; thus, additional work is needed to identify other potential mechanisms for change for this at-risk group.

AB - Background: Alcohol and marijuana co-users are at heightened vulnerability for experiencing a variety of negative alcohol use outcomes including heavier alcohol use and driving under the influence. The current study explored willingness to experience negative consequences as a potential factor underlying the association between co-user status and negative consequences in an effort to guide future intervention work. From a longitudinal study of first-year college students, we examined willingness to experience consequences at Time 2 as a mediator of co-user status at Time 1 and experience of negative consequences at Time 3. Methods: First-year college student drinkers (n = 1,914) at a large university completed surveys in the fall and spring of their freshman year and the fall of their sophomore year. Results: Alcohol and marijuana co-users reported higher willingness to experience consequences than alcohol-only users. Willingness to experience consequences partially explained the association between alcohol and marijuana couse and consequences. Conclusions: The current study was the first to compare co-users of alcohol and marijuana to alcohol-only users on willingness to experience consequences, and examine the role of willingness as a mediator between co-user status and consequences experienced. Co-users were more willing to experience adverse effects from drinking, in turn predicting more consequences. Intervention work targeting consequences may be less effective for co-users; thus, additional work is needed to identify other potential mechanisms for change for this at-risk group.

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