4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively. Among studies with the strongest internal and external validity, none of the 90 estimates (i.e., 0%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to racial or ethnic bias. Of the 18 estimates for languageminority and ELL children combined, only 3 (16.7%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to language use. Two of the 4 ELL-specific estimates (50%) indicated that children receiving English-as-a-second-language services may be overrepresented in special education. Overall, and replicating findings from a prior best-evidence synthesis, this synthesis indicated that children are underidentified as having disabilities based on their race or ethnicity and language use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-279
Number of pages19
JournalExceptional Children
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Child Language
Special Education
Asian Americans
North American Indians
Hispanic Americans
special education
Language
minority
English language
language
trend
evidence
ethnicity
disability
regression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Morgan, Paul ; Farkas, George ; Cook, Michael ; Strassfeld, Natasha M. ; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith ; Pun, Wik Hung ; Wang, Yangyang ; Schussler, Deborah Lynn. / Are hispanic, asian, native american, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?. In: Exceptional Children. 2018 ; Vol. 84, No. 3. pp. 261-279.
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title = "Are hispanic, asian, native american, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?",
abstract = "We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2{\%}), 14/208 (6.7{\%}), 2/37 (5.4{\%}), and 6/91 (6.6{\%}) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively. Among studies with the strongest internal and external validity, none of the 90 estimates (i.e., 0{\%}) indicated overrepresentation attributable to racial or ethnic bias. Of the 18 estimates for languageminority and ELL children combined, only 3 (16.7{\%}) indicated overrepresentation attributable to language use. Two of the 4 ELL-specific estimates (50{\%}) indicated that children receiving English-as-a-second-language services may be overrepresented in special education. Overall, and replicating findings from a prior best-evidence synthesis, this synthesis indicated that children are underidentified as having disabilities based on their race or ethnicity and language use.",
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Are hispanic, asian, native american, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education? / Morgan, Paul; Farkas, George; Cook, Michael; Strassfeld, Natasha M.; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith; Pun, Wik Hung; Wang, Yangyang; Schussler, Deborah Lynn.

In: Exceptional Children, Vol. 84, No. 3, 01.02.2018, p. 261-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Are hispanic, asian, native american, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

AU - Morgan, Paul

AU - Farkas, George

AU - Cook, Michael

AU - Strassfeld, Natasha M.

AU - Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith

AU - Pun, Wik Hung

AU - Wang, Yangyang

AU - Schussler, Deborah Lynn

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively. Among studies with the strongest internal and external validity, none of the 90 estimates (i.e., 0%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to racial or ethnic bias. Of the 18 estimates for languageminority and ELL children combined, only 3 (16.7%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to language use. Two of the 4 ELL-specific estimates (50%) indicated that children receiving English-as-a-second-language services may be overrepresented in special education. Overall, and replicating findings from a prior best-evidence synthesis, this synthesis indicated that children are underidentified as having disabilities based on their race or ethnicity and language use.

AB - We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively. Among studies with the strongest internal and external validity, none of the 90 estimates (i.e., 0%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to racial or ethnic bias. Of the 18 estimates for languageminority and ELL children combined, only 3 (16.7%) indicated overrepresentation attributable to language use. Two of the 4 ELL-specific estimates (50%) indicated that children receiving English-as-a-second-language services may be overrepresented in special education. Overall, and replicating findings from a prior best-evidence synthesis, this synthesis indicated that children are underidentified as having disabilities based on their race or ethnicity and language use.

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