Are there constraints on learned responses to odors from rewarded and nonrewarded rats?

Paul Eslinger, H. Wayne Ludvigson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study determined if test rats could utilize biological odors, generated from donor rats receiving reward (R) and frustrative nonreward (N) treatments, to predict reward and nonreward goal events equally well. In Phase 1, two groups of test rats were exposed to R and N odors that signaled, respectively, either R and N goal events ("same" condition) or N and R goal events ("opposite" condition). Rats demonstrated significant discriminative use of these odors under both conditions. Subjects in the "opposite" condition, however, were slightly slower to learn the discrimination. Reversal learning was readily accomplished in Phase 2, regardless of the same-opposite factor. Thus, little evidence for a constraint on learning was found, and an interpretation in terms of interfering response tendencies and their habituation seemed favored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-456
Number of pages5
JournalAnimal Learning & Behavior
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1980

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odors
rats
Reward
learning
Reversal Learning
testing
Learning
Odorants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Are there constraints on learned responses to odors from rewarded and nonrewarded rats?",
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Are there constraints on learned responses to odors from rewarded and nonrewarded rats? / Eslinger, Paul; Ludvigson, H. Wayne.

In: Animal Learning & Behavior, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.09.1980, p. 452-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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