Art and politics at the Vatican congregation for the oriental churches, 1917-45

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In the period 1917-45, the Roman Catholic Church vacillated in its views of Russian Orthodoxy and the Russian Revolution. Some forces in the Vatican focused on the "consecration" of Russia, connoting support for Orthodoxy. Others preferred to push for the "conversion" of Russia to Roman Catholicism. The tension between these competing views can be seen in the Vatican's patronage of the arts. From 1925-1945, the Congregation for the Oriental Churches commissioned works by four artists-Leonid and Rimma Brailowski, Pimen Sofronov, and Jérôme Leussink. Collectively, their work illustrated the changing mixture of politics, piety, and aesthetics that characterized Rome's view toward Russia in the first half of the twentieth century.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-57
Number of pages16
JournalRussian History
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Russia
Congregations
Oriental
Vatican
Art and Politics
Consecration
Russian Revolution
Rome
Artist
Russian Orthodoxy
Aesthetics
Roman Catholic Church
Orthodoxy
Patronage
Roman Catholicism
Piety
Art

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History

Cite this

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Art and politics at the Vatican congregation for the oriental churches, 1917-45. / Robson, Roy R.

In: Russian History, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 42-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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