Articular cartilage in the knee

current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research.

Michel D. Crema, Frank W. Roemer, Monica D. Marra, Deborah Burstein, Garry E. Gold, Felix Eckstein, Thomas Baum, Timothy J. Mosher, John A. Carrino, Ali Guermazi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important imaging modality for the evaluation of traumatic or degenerative cartilaginous lesions in the knee. It is a powerful noninvasive tool for detecting such lesions and monitoring the effects of pharmacologic and surgical therapy. The specific MR imaging techniques used for these purposes can be divided into two broad categories according to their usefulness for morphologic or compositional evaluation. To assess the structure of knee cartilage, standard spin-echo (SE) and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences, fast SE sequences, and three-dimensional SE and GRE sequences are available. These techniques allow the detection of morphologic defects in the articular cartilage of the knee and are commonly used in research for semiquantitative and quantitative assessments of cartilage. To evaluate the collagen network and proteoglycan content in the knee cartilage matrix, compositional assessment techniques such as T2 mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage (or dGEMRIC), T1ρ imaging, sodium imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging are available. These techniques may be used in various combinations and at various magnetic field strengths in clinical and research settings to improve the characterization of changes in cartilage. RSNA, 2011

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-61
Number of pages25
JournalRadiographics
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Articular Cartilage
Cartilage
Knee
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Research
Gadolinium
Proteoglycans
Magnetic Fields
Collagen
Sodium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Crema, M. D., Roemer, F. W., Marra, M. D., Burstein, D., Gold, G. E., Eckstein, F., ... Guermazi, A. (2011). Articular cartilage in the knee: current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research. Radiographics, 31(1), 37-61. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.311105084
Crema, Michel D. ; Roemer, Frank W. ; Marra, Monica D. ; Burstein, Deborah ; Gold, Garry E. ; Eckstein, Felix ; Baum, Thomas ; Mosher, Timothy J. ; Carrino, John A. ; Guermazi, Ali. / Articular cartilage in the knee : current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research. In: Radiographics. 2011 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 37-61.
@article{f069209cbfad442c8db6156d50203651,
title = "Articular cartilage in the knee: current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research.",
abstract = "Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important imaging modality for the evaluation of traumatic or degenerative cartilaginous lesions in the knee. It is a powerful noninvasive tool for detecting such lesions and monitoring the effects of pharmacologic and surgical therapy. The specific MR imaging techniques used for these purposes can be divided into two broad categories according to their usefulness for morphologic or compositional evaluation. To assess the structure of knee cartilage, standard spin-echo (SE) and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences, fast SE sequences, and three-dimensional SE and GRE sequences are available. These techniques allow the detection of morphologic defects in the articular cartilage of the knee and are commonly used in research for semiquantitative and quantitative assessments of cartilage. To evaluate the collagen network and proteoglycan content in the knee cartilage matrix, compositional assessment techniques such as T2 mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage (or dGEMRIC), T1ρ imaging, sodium imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging are available. These techniques may be used in various combinations and at various magnetic field strengths in clinical and research settings to improve the characterization of changes in cartilage. RSNA, 2011",
author = "Crema, {Michel D.} and Roemer, {Frank W.} and Marra, {Monica D.} and Deborah Burstein and Gold, {Garry E.} and Felix Eckstein and Thomas Baum and Mosher, {Timothy J.} and Carrino, {John A.} and Ali Guermazi",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1148/rg.311105084",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "37--61",
journal = "Radiographics",
issn = "0271-5333",
publisher = "Radiological Society of North America Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Crema, MD, Roemer, FW, Marra, MD, Burstein, D, Gold, GE, Eckstein, F, Baum, T, Mosher, TJ, Carrino, JA & Guermazi, A 2011, 'Articular cartilage in the knee: current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research.', Radiographics, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 37-61. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.311105084

Articular cartilage in the knee : current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research. / Crema, Michel D.; Roemer, Frank W.; Marra, Monica D.; Burstein, Deborah; Gold, Garry E.; Eckstein, Felix; Baum, Thomas; Mosher, Timothy J.; Carrino, John A.; Guermazi, Ali.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 37-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Articular cartilage in the knee

T2 - current MR imaging techniques and applications in clinical practice and research.

AU - Crema, Michel D.

AU - Roemer, Frank W.

AU - Marra, Monica D.

AU - Burstein, Deborah

AU - Gold, Garry E.

AU - Eckstein, Felix

AU - Baum, Thomas

AU - Mosher, Timothy J.

AU - Carrino, John A.

AU - Guermazi, Ali

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important imaging modality for the evaluation of traumatic or degenerative cartilaginous lesions in the knee. It is a powerful noninvasive tool for detecting such lesions and monitoring the effects of pharmacologic and surgical therapy. The specific MR imaging techniques used for these purposes can be divided into two broad categories according to their usefulness for morphologic or compositional evaluation. To assess the structure of knee cartilage, standard spin-echo (SE) and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences, fast SE sequences, and three-dimensional SE and GRE sequences are available. These techniques allow the detection of morphologic defects in the articular cartilage of the knee and are commonly used in research for semiquantitative and quantitative assessments of cartilage. To evaluate the collagen network and proteoglycan content in the knee cartilage matrix, compositional assessment techniques such as T2 mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage (or dGEMRIC), T1ρ imaging, sodium imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging are available. These techniques may be used in various combinations and at various magnetic field strengths in clinical and research settings to improve the characterization of changes in cartilage. RSNA, 2011

AB - Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important imaging modality for the evaluation of traumatic or degenerative cartilaginous lesions in the knee. It is a powerful noninvasive tool for detecting such lesions and monitoring the effects of pharmacologic and surgical therapy. The specific MR imaging techniques used for these purposes can be divided into two broad categories according to their usefulness for morphologic or compositional evaluation. To assess the structure of knee cartilage, standard spin-echo (SE) and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences, fast SE sequences, and three-dimensional SE and GRE sequences are available. These techniques allow the detection of morphologic defects in the articular cartilage of the knee and are commonly used in research for semiquantitative and quantitative assessments of cartilage. To evaluate the collagen network and proteoglycan content in the knee cartilage matrix, compositional assessment techniques such as T2 mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage (or dGEMRIC), T1ρ imaging, sodium imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging are available. These techniques may be used in various combinations and at various magnetic field strengths in clinical and research settings to improve the characterization of changes in cartilage. RSNA, 2011

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955700950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955700950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1148/rg.311105084

DO - 10.1148/rg.311105084

M3 - Review article

VL - 31

SP - 37

EP - 61

JO - Radiographics

JF - Radiographics

SN - 0271-5333

IS - 1

ER -