Aspects of the baroclinic boundary layer

Peter R. Bannon, T. L. Salem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Ekman-Taylor boundary layer model is solved for the case of a linear variation of the geostrophic wind with height. The two-layer model couples a Monin-Ibukhov similarity layer to an Ekman layer with a vertically constant eddy diffusivity. The presence of the thermal wind contributes both an along-isotherm and a cross-isotherm component to the boundary layer flow. The along-isotherm flow is supergeostrophic and results from the net downward transport of geostrophic momentum by the eddies. The cross-isotherm flow is toward the warm air and results from the Coriolis deflection of the geostrophic momentum-rich air aloft that has been mixed downward. The effect of the baroclinity (i.e., the thermal wind shear) on the wind field is conveniently summarized geometrically. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-596
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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isotherm
boundary layer
Ekman layer
momentum
eddy
air
wind shear
wind field
deflection
diffusivity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Bannon, Peter R. ; Salem, T. L. / Aspects of the baroclinic boundary layer. In: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 1995 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 574-596.
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Aspects of the baroclinic boundary layer. / Bannon, Peter R.; Salem, T. L.

In: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 52, No. 5, 01.01.1995, p. 574-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The Ekman-Taylor boundary layer model is solved for the case of a linear variation of the geostrophic wind with height. The two-layer model couples a Monin-Ibukhov similarity layer to an Ekman layer with a vertically constant eddy diffusivity. The presence of the thermal wind contributes both an along-isotherm and a cross-isotherm component to the boundary layer flow. The along-isotherm flow is supergeostrophic and results from the net downward transport of geostrophic momentum by the eddies. The cross-isotherm flow is toward the warm air and results from the Coriolis deflection of the geostrophic momentum-rich air aloft that has been mixed downward. The effect of the baroclinity (i.e., the thermal wind shear) on the wind field is conveniently summarized geometrically. -from Authors

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