Aspectual properties of conversational activities

Rebecca J. Passonneau, Boxuan Guan, Cho Ho Yeung, Yuan Du, Emma Conner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Segmentation of spoken discourse into distinct conversational activities has been applied to broadcast news, meetings, monologs, and two-party dialogs. This paper considers the aspectual properties of discourse segments, meaning how they transpire in time. Classifiers were constructed to distinguish between segment boundaries and non-boundaries, where the sizes of utterance spans to represent data instances were varied, and the locations of segment boundaries relative to these instances. Classifier performance was better for representations that included the end of one discourse segment combined with the beginning of the next. In addition, classification accuracy was better for segments in which speakers accomplish goals with distinctive start and end points.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSIGDIAL 2014 - 15th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue, Proceedings of the Conference
PublisherAssociation for Computational Linguistics (ACL)
Pages228-237
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781941643211
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event15th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue, SIGDIAL 2014 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2014Jun 20 2014

Publication series

NameSIGDIAL 2014 - 15th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue, Proceedings of the Conference

Other

Other15th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue, SIGDIAL 2014
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period6/18/146/20/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Human-Computer Interaction

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