Aspergillus flavus and aspergillus parasiticus: Aflatoxigenic fungi of concern in foods and feeds†: A review

Hassan Gourama, Lloyd B. Bullerman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspergillus flavus and the closely related subspecies parasiticus have long been recognized as major contaminants of organic and nonorganic items. A. flavus, a common soil fungus, can infest a wide range of agricultural products. Some A. flavus varieties produce aflatoxins, which are carcinogenic toxins that induce liver cancer in laboratory animals. A. flavus var. flavus, A. flavus subsp. parasiticus, and A. nomius share the ability to produce aflatoxins. Identification of the A. flavus species group is mainly based on the color and macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the fungus. A. flavus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis depend on substrate, moisture, temperature, pH, aeration, and competing microflora. The growth of A. flavus and aflatoxin production are sometimes unavoidable. Aflatoxins are considered natural contaminants; the ideal control approach is prevention of mold growth and aflatoxin production. The detection of members of the A. flavus species group in foods and feed is generally carried out by using plate techniques such as surface spread or direct plating. Research on alternative fungal detection methods is still in its infancy. Few immunoassay techniques have been investigated in this regard. Aflatoxins are generally analyzed by chemical methods, although immunochemical methods which use antibodies are becoming common analytical tools for aflatoxins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1395-1404
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Food Protection
Volume58
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995

Fingerprint

Aspergillus flavus
Aspergillus parasiticus
Aflatoxins
Aspergillus
aflatoxins
Fungi
Food
fungi
Nomius
Growth
methodology
liver neoplasms
soil fungi
food groups
Laboratory Animals
infancy
Liver Neoplasms
agricultural products
immunoassays
Immunoassay

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "Aspergillus flavus and aspergillus parasiticus: Aflatoxigenic fungi of concern in foods and feeds†: A review",
abstract = "Aspergillus flavus and the closely related subspecies parasiticus have long been recognized as major contaminants of organic and nonorganic items. A. flavus, a common soil fungus, can infest a wide range of agricultural products. Some A. flavus varieties produce aflatoxins, which are carcinogenic toxins that induce liver cancer in laboratory animals. A. flavus var. flavus, A. flavus subsp. parasiticus, and A. nomius share the ability to produce aflatoxins. Identification of the A. flavus species group is mainly based on the color and macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the fungus. A. flavus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis depend on substrate, moisture, temperature, pH, aeration, and competing microflora. The growth of A. flavus and aflatoxin production are sometimes unavoidable. Aflatoxins are considered natural contaminants; the ideal control approach is prevention of mold growth and aflatoxin production. The detection of members of the A. flavus species group in foods and feed is generally carried out by using plate techniques such as surface spread or direct plating. Research on alternative fungal detection methods is still in its infancy. Few immunoassay techniques have been investigated in this regard. Aflatoxins are generally analyzed by chemical methods, although immunochemical methods which use antibodies are becoming common analytical tools for aflatoxins.",
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Aspergillus flavus and aspergillus parasiticus : Aflatoxigenic fungi of concern in foods and feeds†: A review. / Gourama, Hassan; Bullerman, Lloyd B.

In: Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 58, No. 12, 12.1995, p. 1395-1404.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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